Norway graves re-use at 50 per cent / News / The Foreigner

Norway graves re-use at 50 per cent. One western Norway city faces a shortage within 25 years, reports say. Municipalities are bound by law to have enough grave space for three per cent of their inhabitants at any one time. However, about half of those buried in Norway are placed into graves previously belonging to another deceased person.

burials, cemeteries



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norway graves re-use at 50 per cent

Published on Tuesday, 5th January, 2016 at 13:20 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 5th January 2016 at 17:43.

One western Norway city faces a shortage within 25 years, reports say.

Our Saviour’s Cemetery Oslo South side (illus. ph.)
Our Saviour’s Cemetery Oslo South side (illus. ph.)
Photo: Chris Nyborg/Wikimedia Commons


Municipalities are bound by law to have enough grave space for three per cent of their inhabitants at any one time.

However, about half of those buried in Norway are placed into graves previously belonging to another deceased person.

Increasing amounts of land areas would have to be requisitioned if this was not done, according to Åse Skrøvset.

Ms Skrøvset, cemetery advisor at southern Norway’s Diocese of Tunsberg, also remarked that coffins require more space than urns.

“We’re dependent upon using graves anew to provide space for enough people,” she told Christian publication Vårt Land.

Inghild Hareide Hansen, head Bergen’s cemeteries, remarked that “lack of space has forced us to re-open graves, but this [practice] is commonplace rather than unusual.”

The western Norway city currently has adequate capacity, but will need more plots for use by 2040.

“We’ve calculated we’ll need up to 60,000 in about 25 years,” added Ms Hansen.

Facts

  • Some 40,000 people die in Norway each year
  • Burial must occur within ten days after passing
  • Cremation is permitted unless it becomes known that this is against the wishes of the bereaved
  • Urns containing ashes must be buried as soon as possible following cremation, in general
  • The bereaved do not have to pay to keep the grave for the first 20 years after the burial
  • It costs a couple of hundred kroner a year after this time
  • People who have died at sea or in war, or under similar circumstances, and who are not buried in a cemetery, may have their name placed on an existing or new headstone

(Additional source: The Norwegian Ministry of Culture)




Published on Tuesday, 5th January, 2016 at 13:20 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 5th January 2016 at 17:43.

This post has the following tags: burials, cemeteries.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!