Norway has too many long and winding roads, motorist lobby says / News / The Foreigner

Norway has too many long and winding roads, motorist lobby says. The Norwegian government continues to be given a bumpy ride over its infrastructure policies. Four days before the publication of the national transport plan vehicle lobbyist group the Norwegian Road Federation (OFV) claims that the Norwegian state possesses eighty per cent more road than necessary. Norway has a total of 10,400 kilomters of national road- so-called ‘riksvei’, a road of which the central state is in charge.

norwayroads, nationaltransportplannorway



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Norway has too many long and winding roads, motorist lobby says

Published on Tuesday, 9th April, 2013 at 13:16 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.

The Norwegian government continues to be given a bumpy ride over its infrastructure policies.

Norwegian mountain road
Norwegian mountain road
Photo: Cristapper/IStockphotos


Four days before the publication of the national transport plan vehicle lobbyist group the Norwegian Road Federation (OFV) claims that the Norwegian state possesses eighty per cent more road than necessary.

Norway has a total of 10,400 kilomters of national road- so-called ‘riksvei’, a road of which the central state is in charge.

OFV maintains a mere 3,600 km would have been sufficient if the roads were built according to the standard of Norway's European neighbours, newspaper Aftenposten reports, Tuesday.

An adequate standard could have meant a three to four-hour travelling time between Oslo and Bergen, with Bergen to Stavanger a mere two hours.

Recent leaks about the NTP regarding Bergen-Stavanger indicate it has been revised and been given a huge upgrade, however. Subsea tunnels will make the entire main road from Stavanger to Trondheim ferry-free.

Norway’s Road Federation thinks main roads should be (Norwegian) motorway standard, with two lanes in each direction between the main cites.

They argue this would have covered the main needs for the routes with heaviest traffic.

Such a change would cut down the length of the roads to a mere 3,600 kilometres according to them.

They also want to implement road toll-capping, which today often finances some 75 per cent, and in some cases up to 90 per cent of new roads. The federation wants this slashed to 50 per cent.

In a related transport issue, small island communities’ inhabitant numbers have fallen following being linked to the mainland with bridges and in some cases tunnels.

Helge Brunborg at Statistics Norway told NRK job and education possibilities are more important than roads to the mainland.

Norway’s government has long had a policy of building roads to often isolated districts.

Nonetheless, the numbers show that the effect of new and expensive infrastructure to the doorways of dismal daily lives has been limited, as the more central roads are lagging behind in development.  

Published on Tuesday, 9th April, 2013 at 13:16 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.

This post has the following tags: norwayroads, nationaltransportplannorway.





  
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