Norway health report published / News / The Foreigner

Norway health report published. A new OECD report out today covers Norway’s recent progress in the world’s health league tables. According to the study, OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries have shown an improvement in the quality of medical care for chronic conditions, as well as higher survival rates for life-threatening diseases. Generally, hospital admission rates for diabetes and asthma, whilst obesity rates have increased twice or three times in many countries since 1980. The Foreigner has previously reported countries such as Scotland looking to Norway for inspiration to clamp down on their alcohol consumption, and Norway’s debatable anti-smoking campaign.

norwayoecdhealthreport, norwaycancerrates



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Norway health report published

Published on Wednesday, 23rd November, 2011 at 12:31 under the news category, by John Price and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 23rd November 2011 at 14:03.

A new OECD report out today covers Norway’s recent progress in the world’s health league tables.

A Stethoscope
A Stethoscope
Photo: Huji/Wikimedia Commons


According to the study, OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries have shown an improvement in the quality of medical care for chronic conditions, as well as higher survival rates for life-threatening diseases. Generally, hospital admission rates for diabetes and asthma, whilst obesity rates have increased twice or three times in many countries since 1980.

The Foreigner has previously reported countries such as Scotland looking to Norway for inspiration to clamp down on their alcohol consumption, and Norway’s debatable anti-smoking campaign.

Elderly care in Norway is the third best worldwide, but traffic fatalities are amongst the worst in Europe. The following shows Norway’s performance from recent years:

Hearts and cancer

Norway public’s life expectancy is averaged at 81 years, which is within the top ten in Europe. Japan leads with an average age of 83, Turkey last with people dying at approximately 74.

Obesity rates are one of the lowest but on a slight increase. Korea has least obesity, whilst Americans top the statistics.

Norway came 11th in so-called Ischemic Heart disease (IHD) fatalities, and 13th for stroke fatalities, well below the OECD average. Least IHD-related deaths occur in Korea, most in the Russian Federation. Countries with fewest and most stroke deaths are Israel and the Russian Federation, respectively.

Whilst earlier detection and improved treatment have contributed to higher survival rates for various cancer types, mortality rates for prostate cancer are among the worst. Norway came 30th out of 34 countries, 11 below the OECD average. Best was Korea, worst Estonia.

Nevertheless, the survival rate for cervical cancer for women who have been diagnosed in Norway is the highest (78.2%), with Ireland coming last (57.6%). Norway came 6th for survival rates of breast cancer, top was Korea, bottom Denmark.

Least people died from lung cancer in Mexico, most in Hungary, with Norway coming 10th. There was a 34.4% decline in smokers, but 21% of Norwegian population smoke daily.

Accidents, AIDS and alcohol

Transport accidents were down 33.3% in the last 15 years making the rates one of the lowest (6th place). Iceland had least accidents, with most people dying in the Russian Federation. Suicide rates are down 7.6%. Most suicides occurred in Korea, whilst Greece had the lowest rate. Infant mortality rates were 3.1 per every 1,000, below OECD average. Iceland had fewest, India most.

Norway’s diabetes rate for adult patients between 20-79 years was second lowest in the world behind Iceland, Mexico was worst, but the number of children aged 0-14 who suffer from Type 1 was one of the highest (31st place out of 33, just behind the UK). Finland had the most, China least.

The HIV/Aids rate was among the lowest (3.7 new cases (0.08%, 10th place) per million in 2009 or the nearest year). Iceland had no new incidence of AIDS, putting it in first place, but the HIV prevalence rate was 0.31%. South Africa had the most new cases of AIDS, with the highest HIV prevalence.

Norway’s rate of alcohol consumption for people over 15 increased by 12% between 1980 and 2009 (6.7 litres per capita). Indonesia had the least number of drinkers, France the most – 0.1 and 12.3 litres per capita, respectively.

In other statistics, Norway topped the readmission rates to the same hospital for schizophrenia; lowest was the Slovak Republic. Waiting time for specialist treatment for four weeks or more was 50% last year. Long-term care from home increased from 70.4% in 1999 to 76.7% in 2009.



Published on Wednesday, 23rd November, 2011 at 12:31 under the news category, by John Price and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 23rd November 2011 at 14:03.

This post has the following tags: norwayoecdhealthreport, norwaycancerrates.





  
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