Norway hospital in police human trafficking case / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway hospital in police human trafficking case. Politicians have formally reported Oslo University Hospital (OUS) to police for allegedly exploiting Filipino nurses, reports say. It is claimed the hospital brought staff to Norway via an intermediary in a Norway-based furniture restoration company. A hospital head of section allegedly contributed to this process by signing documents. Emails sent between those in charge of the hospital suggest that they were aware that these Filipino women had been brought here in order to work as nurses there. A hospital employee denies knowledge of the correspondence, however.

oslouniversityhospital, humantraffickingnorway



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Norway hospital in police human trafficking case

Published on Friday, 9th March, 2012 at 09:07 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 9th March 2012 at 09:19.

Politicians have formally reported Oslo University Hospital (OUS) to police for allegedly exploiting Filipino nurses, reports say.



It is claimed the hospital brought staff to Norway via an intermediary in a Norway-based furniture restoration company. A hospital head of section allegedly contributed to this process by signing documents.

Emails sent between those in charge of the hospital suggest that they were aware that these Filipino women had been brought here in order to work as nurses there. A hospital employee denies knowledge of the correspondence, however.

There are also reports the institution committed a criminal offence amongst revelations it did not possess work permits for the women.

Once in Norway, the three women involved were subsequently forced to take loans of up to 300,000 kroner, and then pay it back to the owners of the furniture restoration businesses from their salary via a bank loan.

This left them with little from their wages following housing rental costs of 11,000 kroner each at a property provided to them, and the individual 6,000 kroner loan payments, reports NRK.

Nevertheless, it was not until yesterday that Oslo University Hospital launched its own internal enquiry following Progress Party (FrP) MP Kari Kjønaas Kjos’ formal notification to police. Senior personnel are cooperating fully in the investigation.

“This happened in 2010, and I only got to know about it last Wednesday. I then immediately set a review of this matter in motion. This is not a way to recruit medical staff. This is not how we do things,” said OUS Managing Director Bjørn Erikstein

In turn, the hospital has formally reported the furniture restoration company to police for fraud.

“The hospital has reported us for something they are the architects of,” alleged one of the firm’s owners, “I told the hospital the project had to be financed by the women taking out a loan. At that point, the hospital said it was none of their concern.”



Published on Friday, 9th March, 2012 at 09:07 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 9th March 2012 at 09:19.

This post has the following tags: oslouniversityhospital, humantraffickingnorway.





  
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