Norway hosts multination Jewish Culture Festival / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway hosts multination Jewish Culture Festival. Klezmer, theater, folk, ballroom, jazz, literature, history and cuisine are coming to northern Norway’s Trondheim. Artists from the Scandinavian country are set to be joined by contemporaries from Norway, Hungary, Poland, Israel, Sweden, and the US at next month’s Jkfest. Jkfest’s program has lots of music, performances and discussion panels. One of the main attractions of this year festival’s program is the Budapest Klezmer Band, one of the most respected bands in the genre in Europe, according to organizers.

jews, norway, culture, trondheim



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norway hosts multination Jewish Culture Festival

Published on Tuesday, 26th August, 2014 at 11:20 under the news category, by Martyna Kwaśniewska and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 1st September 2014 at 13:14.

Klezmer, theater, folk, ballroom, jazz, literature, history and cuisine are coming to northern Norway’s Trondheim.



Artists from the Scandinavian country are set to be joined by contemporaries from Norway, Hungary, Poland, Israel, Sweden, and the US at next month’s Jkfest.

Jkfest’s program has lots of music, performances and discussion panels. One of the main attractions of this year festival’s program is the Budapest Klezmer Band, one of the most respected bands in the genre in Europe, according to organizers.

Performing for the first time in Trondheim, they are billed to play in the Synagogue on Saturday, 6th September.

Another significant item on the program is the theater performance, Fabrik: The Legend of Moritz Rabinowitz by Wakka Wakka Productions.

Norwegian Jew Moritz Moses Rabinowitz (20th September 1887 – 27th February 1942) was a Polish Jew from the small town of Rajgród sent to Norway by his parents in the early 1900s to escape the persecution and pogroms. He settled in western Norway’s Haugesund and is said to have built northern Europe’s most modern apparel factories “from a button.”

Rabinowitz also wrote columns about large problems in Europe for local and national papers, attacking theories of race biology and anti-Semitism. His writings gradually became more focused on warnings to his compatriots about the rise of Hitler and the Nazis.

While most people ignored his foreboding condemnation, the Nazis considered him to be “the leader of the Jewish resistance in Norway”. Nazi Germany invaded Norway in on 9th April 1940 under Operation Weserübung. Arrested by the Gestapo in Hordaland County’s Skånevik after being on the run,Rabinowitz was first sent to and detained at the Lagård regional jail in Stavanger.

Møllergata 19 jail in Oslo was the last place he was incarcerarted before being deported on the MS Monte Rosa on 22nd May 1941. The vessel docked at Stettin in Poland. Moritz Rabinowitz died in Germany’s Sachsenhausen concentration camp on 27th February 1942.

Fabrik: The Legend of Moritz Rabinowitz  is written, directed, designed, and performed by the Wakka Wakka ensemble (David Arkema (US), Gabriella Brechner (US), Kirjan Waage (Norway), and Gwendolyn Warnock (US). The puppet theatre piece is inspired by Nordic and Yiddish folktales. Performances are scheduled for 5th and 6th September.

Jkfest also plans presentations of books by Anne Sende and Arne Vestbø with a discussion panel held by NRK Trøndelag’s editor Sigrid Gjellan. Anne Sender won the Freedom of Expression Prize for her book "Our Jewish journey" and Arne Vestbø authored the biography of Moritz Moses Rabinowitz.

Another discussion panel at the festival is going to deal with a question are the Norwegian Jews considered guests or Norwegian citizens in line with the rest of the population? This is in light of this year’s bicentennial celebrations of the Norwegian Constitution and Paragraph 2.

The panlists for this part of Festival’s discussions are author Håkon Harket, Jewish psychologist and chairwoman of the Oslo-based Center for Studies of the Holocaust Berit Reisel, psychologist and Jew Nikolaj Kahn, and Knut Andreas Grimstad – Associate Professor of Central Europe and Balkan Studies and at the University of Oslo chairing the panel.

Jkfest is a chance to get familiar with Jewish culture and explore your own knowledge of it, according to organizers, who also emphasize the festival’s informative and reflective value.

They hope that more tolerance and understanding can be spread and promoted through a closer meeting with Jewish culture. They say that participation in and attending the festival means a contribution in the fight against hatred, bigotry and intolerance.

The festival’s full program can be found here (external link – in Norwegian only). It runs from 5th-7th September.




Published on Tuesday, 26th August, 2014 at 11:20 under the news category, by Martyna Kwaśniewska and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 1st September 2014 at 13:14.

This post has the following tags: jews, norway, culture, trondheim.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!