Norway immigrant educational programmes show disparity - report / News / The Foreigner

Norway immigrant educational programmes show disparity - report. Only one in ten immigrants needing primary and secondary education are offered such training in Oslo, research foundation Fafo says. In comparison, nine out of ten immigrants in western Norway’s Sunndal municipality are offered primary and secondary education as a part of the introduction programme there. Fafo’s Right to Education report highlights that there are significant variations between municipalities and the kind of education facilities provided for immigrants.

immigration, norway, jobs, employment, discrimination, racism, xenophobia, asylum



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Norway immigrant educational programmes show disparity - report

Published on Monday, 8th September, 2014 at 09:26 under the news category, by Susanne Tunge Østhus.
Last Updated on 8th September 2014 at 12:14.

Only one in ten immigrants needing primary and secondary education are offered such training in Oslo, research foundation Fafo says.

Desk
Different education and introduction programme practices are hampering immigrants to Norway becoming part of society and gaining employment.Desk
Photo: Jordan Fischer/Wikimedia Commons


In comparison, nine out of ten immigrants in western Norway’s Sunndal municipality are offered primary and secondary education as a part of the introduction programme there.

Fafo’s Right to Education report highlights that there are significant variations between municipalities and the kind of education facilities provided for immigrants.

All municipalities in Norway have had to conduct introduction programmes since 2004 for asylum seekers, resettlement refugees, individuals granted residence on humanitarian grounds after applying for asylum, and family members of the mentioned groups.

The goal of the programme is to give newly arrived immigrants the tools to partake in Norwegian social and professional life.

The people in these target groups, aged between 18 – 55, have the right and obligation to participate in the introduction programme, according to the Ministry of Children, Equality and Social Inclusion.

An issue Fafo’s report points out is that the disparity between municipalities can be a result of the legislation being open to interpretation.

The document also outlines that different municipalities’ poor financial health contributes to the introduction programme and its primary and secondary education offers not being well enough advertised.

Reimbursement cuts the Rightist coalition government announced earlier this year have caused problems for municipalities to resettle refugees and asylum seekers.

Immigrants are also often reluctant to participate in the introduction programme, Fafo’s report points out. This is because their financial situation would be uncertain if they could not finish the programme on time when introduction benefits cease.

Moreover, the introduction programme sets out to enable immigrants to get employment. Many immigrants are experiencing being discriminated against in the job market because of their ethnicity, however.

Second and third generation immigrants are also experiencing this discrimination due to having a foreign surname.

The Anti-Discrimination Act prohibits discrimination based on ethnicity, national origin, descent, skin colour, language, religion or belief.

The Act also refers to specific legislation concerning discrimination in working life:

“Indirect discrimination in working life shall mean any apparently neutral provision, condition, practice, act or omission that in fact has the effect of putting a job applicant or employee in a less favourable position than other job applicants or employees on such grounds as are mentioned in the first paragraph,” it states.

British Academic Mette Wiggen, Teaching Fellow at the University of Leeds, has cited Norway as being particularly bad on racism.




Published on Monday, 8th September, 2014 at 09:26 under the news category, by Susanne Tunge Østhus.
Last updated on 8th September 2014 at 12:14.

This post has the following tags: immigration, norway, jobs, employment, discrimination, racism, xenophobia, asylum.





  
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