Norway immigration sees high East European numbers / News / The Foreigner

Norway immigration sees high East European numbers. A total of 79,500 immigrants came to Norway last year with a third of these arriving from Eastern Europe, statistics show. Recent results from Statistics Norway (SSB) also show that Oslo, Hordaland, Rogaland and Akeshus are the places many choose to make their new home. The majority of these immigrants (12,861 of 29,000) came from Poland, the country with the largest number of labour migrants since it joined the EU countries. There are now around 67,300 Poles living in Norway, with most working in the building sector.

norwayimmigrationlevels, foreignerstonorway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norway immigration sees high East European numbers

Published on Sunday, 13th May, 2012 at 16:54 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and John Price      .

A total of 79,500 immigrants came to Norway last year with a third of these arriving from Eastern Europe, statistics show.

Norwegian border
Norwegian border
Photo: Hardo Müller/Flickr


Recent results from Statistics Norway (SSB) also show that Oslo, Hordaland, Rogaland and Akeshus are the places many choose to make their new home.

The majority of these immigrants (12,861 of 29,000) came from Poland, the country with the largest number of labour migrants since it joined the EU countries. There are now around 67,300 Poles living in Norway, with most working in the building sector.

According to HRH King Harald of Norway, who was in Poland with HRH Queen Sonja on an official state visit last week, “We have no personal experience with Poles but we know many who have, and they are very pleased.”

“We have also talked with some Poles now who say they have the feeling, which I believe is correct, that Poles are very well received in Norway,” his majesty told NTB.

The Queen also confirmed that, “We also need them and we get very good help. They also thrive on Norway’s outer islands, which is surprising.”

TRH say Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk also worked in Norway for four months working as a carpenter, helping to build a school.

Some companies such as Tide look to other countries for their employees due to a lack of Norwegians with the skills needed.

Moreover, Hordaland-based FMC Technologies from the Sotra archipelago, western Norway, has also set up a branch in Poland responsible for recruitment.

Communications manager, Andreas Helgesen said to NRK, “We see that it is so much easier to find good, qualified engineers in Poland than Norway.”

It is believed that Norway needs about 16,000 engineers and Mr Helgesen added that employing foreigners helps to fill these spaces.

8,739 Norwegians returned to Norway in 2011, whilst 9,583 emigrated.




Published on Sunday, 13th May, 2012 at 16:54 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and John Price      .

This post has the following tags: norwayimmigrationlevels, foreignerstonorway.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!