Norway increases fatal disease-fighting funding / News / The Foreigner

Norway increases fatal disease-fighting funding. The Norwegian government contributes almost USD 279 million to international organization Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The three-year NOK 1.7 billion allocation to the international organization between 2014 and 2016 is an increase of over 25% on 2011-13. “A growing number of people are receiving treatment for these diseases, fewer people are dying from them, and the incidence of new infections is falling,” said Minister of Foreign Affairs Børge Brende in a statement, Tuesday.

norwayfunding, aids, hiv, tuberculosis, malaria



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norway increases fatal disease-fighting funding

Published on Tuesday, 3rd December, 2013 at 19:44 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.

The Norwegian government contributes almost USD 279 million to international organization Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Norway Foreign Minister Børge Brende
'Long-term, predictable support is vital for succeeding in the fight against AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria,' Minister Brende says.Norway Foreign Minister Børge Brende
Photo: M.B. Haga/Ministry of Foreign Affairs


The three-year NOK 1.7 billion allocation to the international organization between 2014 and 2016 is an increase of over 25% on 2011-13.

“A growing number of people are receiving treatment for these diseases, fewer people are dying from them, and the incidence of new infections is falling,” said Minister of Foreign Affairs Børge Brende in a statement, Tuesday.

“Yet, it is crucial that we don’t forget how serious these diseases continue to affect people’s lives and communities,” he added.

Six million people are receiving treatments for HIV/AIDS through programs funded by the Global Fund. 

According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), AIDS-related deaths have dropped by 30 percent since the peak year in 2005.

The organization also states that according to the UN around 1.1 million deaths from malaria were prevented, between 2000 and 2010.

Numbers of people infected with tuberculosis is declining as more are receiving treatment for the disease.

“Long-term, predictable support is vital for succeeding in the fight against these diseases,” said Minister of Foreign Affairs Brende.

“Lack of funding will have serious consequences, such as a rising incidence of new infections.”

There are currently 35 million people living with HIV. 1.6 million persons die from AIDS annually. 

UNAIDS reported there has been a 13 per cent increase in HIV infections in Eastern Europe and Central Asia in the last since 7 years.

A doubling of HIV infections has occurred in the Middle East and North Africa since 2001.

“Every person counts,” said Michel Sidibé, Executive Director of UNAIDS. “If we are going to keep our pledge of leaving no one behind—we have to make sure HIV services reach everyone in need.”

Tuberculosis affects 1.4 million lives every year and malaria is still one of the main causes of fatalities in developing countries.



Published on Tuesday, 3rd December, 2013 at 19:44 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.

This post has the following tags: norwayfunding, aids, hiv, tuberculosis, malaria.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!