Norway-Indonesian rainforest agreement jeopardised / News / The Foreigner

Norway-Indonesian rainforest agreement jeopardised. Norwegian Environment and Development Minister Erik Solheim may withdraw financial support Indonesia if authorities decide to define palm oil plantations as forests. Head of Greenpeace Norway, Truls Gulowsen, says to NRK he thinks that calling the palm oil plantations as being part of the forests violates “the intentions of this agreement that Indonesia has with Norway”. He also states that Indonesian authorities play with “constructive definitions” in order to turn away from the agreement and use the funds to stop the deforestation. The Indonesian government’s own climate committee shows preserving the rainforest is neither cost nor climate-effective. The agreement, worth six billion kroner, regards protecting Indonesian forests to reduce CO2 emissions. This could be in danger of being undermined because of strong Indonesian industrial interests, according to a Greenpeace report. The authorities want to use Norway’s money to develop more palm oil plantations.

indonesianrainforestagreement, norwegianfunding, redd, eriksolheim



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Norway-Indonesian rainforest agreement jeopardised

Published on Tuesday, 27th September, 2011 at 13:16 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.
Last Updated on 29th February 2012 at 13:31.

Norwegian Environment and Development Minister Erik Solheim may withdraw financial support Indonesia if authorities decide to define palm oil plantations as forests.

rainforest
rainforest
Photo: tauntingpanda/Flickr


Head of Greenpeace Norway, Truls Gulowsen, says to NRK he thinks that calling the palm oil plantations as being part of the forests violates “the intentions of this agreement that Indonesia has with Norway”. He also states that Indonesian authorities play with “constructive definitions” in order to turn away from the agreement and use the funds to stop the deforestation. The Indonesian government’s own climate committee shows preserving the rainforest is neither cost nor climate-effective.

The agreement, worth six billion kroner, regards protecting Indonesian forests to reduce CO2 emissions. This could be in danger of being undermined because of strong Indonesian industrial interests, according to a Greenpeace report. The authorities want to use Norway’s money to develop more palm oil plantations.

Erik Solheim is attending the Forests Indonesia: Alternative Futures to meet demands for food, fiber, fuel and REDD+ conference this week. Its purpose is to discuss previously agreed Norwegian financial support for the protection of Indonesian rainforests. The minister does not believe considering palm oil plantations as rainforests corresponds with plans to reduce CO2 emissions and protecting the environment.

The Jakarta Post reports the minister says Norway could object if palm oil producers expanded plantations under certain conditions.

That is a feasible policy if it is already degraded land. We have seen some positive developments with some of the big palm oil producers wanting to adopt an environmentally friendly outlook. Some of them have accepted international verification for selling their products without destroying the forests. But that cannot replace conservation of the rain forests because rain forest cannot be cut down and then reforested.”

Indonesia’s government has since revoked legislation recognizing oil palm plantations as forest, and Minister Solheim tells NRK, “The money will be performance-based, meaning that Indonesia will receive the money when it protects the rainforests. They will simply not be given Norwegian funds if they turn rainforests into palm oil plantations.”

Norway’s Climate and Forest Initiative was launched at the UN climate summit in Bali in December 2007. Its aim is to decrease greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector and reduce deforestation in developing countries, internationally described as REDD+.

Several countries across the world are partners, including Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, Tanzania, the Congo Basin, and Guyana.




Published on Tuesday, 27th September, 2011 at 13:16 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.
Last updated on 29th February 2012 at 13:31.

This post has the following tags: indonesianrainforestagreement, norwegianfunding, redd, eriksolheim.





  
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