Norway joins Japan in rejecting South Atlantic whale sanctuary / News / The Foreigner

Norway joins Japan in rejecting South Atlantic whale sanctuary. A South American proposal to designate the entire South Atlantic as a whale sanctuary was temporarily defeated by a bloc of 21 countries amongst stormy scenes at the International Whaling Commission’s 63rd meeting yesterday. Brazil and Argentina wanted to create a whale sanctuary zone between South America and Africa, stretching as far north as the Equator and as far south as Cape Horn, which is located just off the southern tip of Chile. When it seemed probable that the commission’s 89 member countries were likely to have to vote on the motion, delegates from Japan, Cambodia, Cameroon, Gambia, Iceland, Ivory Coast, Norway, Nauru, Mongolia, Mauritania, Guinea-Bissau, Grenade, Kiribati, Morocco, Korea, Ghana, Palau, Togo, Tuvalu, St Kitts & Nevis and St Lucia all left the meeting room.

norwaywhaling, internationalwhalingcommissionmeeting, southatlanticwhalesanctuary



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Norway joins Japan in rejecting South Atlantic whale sanctuary

Published on Friday, 15th July, 2011 at 21:42 under the news category, by Gareth Corfield.

A South American proposal to designate the entire South Atlantic as a whale sanctuary was temporarily defeated by a bloc of 21 countries amongst stormy scenes at the International Whaling Commission’s 63rd meeting yesterday.

A Whaling boat in Sandefjord (illus. ph.)
A Whaling boat in Sandefjord (illus. ph.)
Photo: Are Karlsen/Shutterstock Images


Brazil and Argentina wanted to create a whale sanctuary zone between South America and Africa, stretching as far north as the Equator and as far south as Cape Horn, which is located just off the southern tip of Chile.

When it seemed probable that the commission’s 89 member countries were likely to have to vote on the motion, delegates from Japan, Cambodia, Cameroon, Gambia, Iceland, Ivory Coast, Norway, Nauru, Mongolia, Mauritania, Guinea-Bissau, Grenade, Kiribati, Morocco, Korea, Ghana, Palau, Togo, Tuvalu, St Kitts & Nevis and St Lucia all left the meeting room.

Meanwhile, Russia merely asked for the proposal to be withdrawn.

“Instead of the historic creation of a South Atlantic Whale Sanctuary, which is backed by most member countries, the impasse created today by pro-whaling nations has caused this IWC meeting to end in acrimony. Latin American countries have waited a decade for this sanctuary that has once again been blocked due to Japan and its allies” said Greenpeace spokesperson Willie Mackenzie.

The IWC has resolved to debate the issue again at a later meeting and is considering how its voting rules can be amended to stop mass walkouts from bringing proceedings to a halt.

Last year Norway caught 468 minke whales. Figures for the value of whale trading to Norway are not publicly available, although commercial whaling was subjected to an international moratorium in 1991. Norway resumed whaling in 1994, citing various objections to the moratorium, although since then it has only filled its assigned quota once.




Published on Friday, 15th July, 2011 at 21:42 under the news category, by Gareth Corfield.

This post has the following tags: norwaywhaling, internationalwhalingcommissionmeeting, southatlanticwhalesanctuary.





  
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