Norway leads Baltic Sea Council / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway leads Baltic Sea Council. Norway has now taken over presidency of the Council of the Baltic Sea from Lithuania, headed by Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre. In keeping with the 2008 reform adopted by the Council, Norway will focus on the five priority areas of energy, the environment, economic development, education and culture, and civil security. The Norwegian Presidency also means issues particularly important for the country will be looked into, such as maritime policy.

council, baltic, sea, norway, jonas, gahr, stoere, foreign, minister, germany, lithuania, ministry, justice, children, equality, social, inclusion, maritime, human, trafficking



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Norway leads Baltic Sea Council

Published on Friday, 2nd July, 2010 at 11:24 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

Norway has now taken over presidency of the Council of the Baltic Sea from Lithuania, headed by Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre.



In keeping with the 2008 reform adopted by the Council, Norway will focus on the five priority areas of energy, the environment, economic development, education and culture, and civil security.

The Norwegian Presidency also means issues particularly important for the country will be looked into, such as maritime policy.

About 15 percent of all international shipping traffic currently passes through the Baltic Sea Region, and a substantial growth is expected in the next few years.

As well as being crucial to economic development, this presents challenges regarding pollution, energy, security, and the environment.

One of the aims of the Presidency is converting all ships to run on LNG. This is to reduce both harmful climate emissions, as well as further pollution of an ecologically-destabilised sea area containing foreign organisms introduced via ballast tank water.

Moreover, Norway is determined to tackle the Baltic Sea region’s human trafficking issue. The problem affects women, children, and the labour market, contributes to undermining asylum policies, and promotes other forms of criminality.

Three groups have been established to look into the problem, which will now also involve the Ministry of Justice, and the Ministry of Children, Equality, and Social Inclusion (Barne-, likestillings- og inkluderingsdepartementet).

The Norwegian Presidency will also seek to empower the Council of the Baltic Sea and make it more visible as an organisation by pursuing close collaboration with other international bodies.

Germany will take over the Presidency of the Baltic Council on 01 July 2011 under an annually-rotating system involving all eleven countries’ members of the Council.



Published on Friday, 2nd July, 2010 at 11:24 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

This post has the following tags: council, baltic, sea, norway, jonas, gahr, stoere, foreign, minister, germany, lithuania, ministry, justice, children, equality, social, inclusion, maritime, human, trafficking.





  
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