Norway leads in Europe violence at work incidents / News / The Foreigner

Norway leads in Europe violence at work incidents. FINAL: Norwegian personnel are more likely to be subject to violent incidents at their place of work than all EU countries but one, a surprising report by researchers shows. A startling 3.7 percent of staff in seemingly quiet Norway has reported they experienced this in the past year alone. Only France tops the statistics with 3.8 percent. The EU average is 1.9 percent.

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Norway leads in Europe violence at work incidents

Published on Monday, 10th December, 2012 at 13:23 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 4th March 2013 at 15:10.

FINAL: Norwegian personnel are more likely to be subject to violent incidents at their place of work than all EU countries but one, a surprising report by researchers shows.

Colleagues (illustration photo)
Colleagues (illustration photo)
Photo: VojtechVlk/Shutterstock


A startling 3.7 percent of staff in seemingly quiet Norway has reported they experienced this in the past year alone.

Only France tops the statistics with 3.8 percent. The EU average is 1.9 percent.

Norway also has a clear lead regarding violence on its Scandinavian neighbours Denmark and Sweden, at 2.7 and 2.5 percent, respectively.

Experiencing threats and humiliating behaviour at work during the past month – 7.8 percent report this – are also more common in Norway, which ranks level with the UK, according to the report by Department of Occupational Health Surveillance (NOA) researchers. NOA is at the National Institute of Occupational Health (STAMI).

Workers in the Health and Care, Sales, and Educational sectors were more likely to be subjected to this than in others. At the same time, the figures reflect all types of work.

The Foreigner asked the NOA researchers what they thought the causes of these surprising statistics were.

“That’s a little difficult to say” Cecilie Aagestad replies, “They might be related to cultural issues, or other things.”

“We also have the Working Environment Act in Norway. Negative social behaviour is not accepted in our more open society when it comes to reporting it.”

EU body European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Eurofound) conducted an earlier study, the “Fifth European Working Conditions Survey” (EWCS), in all 27 EU countries (EU27).

Norway, Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Turkey, Albania, and Kosovo also participated in it.

It contains six questions on various types of adverse social behaviour. As well as physical violence, threats, and humiliating behavior, it includes verbal abuse, unwanted sexual attention, bullying, harassment, and sexual harassment.

According to researchers, “The first three questions asked respondents whether they had suffered verbal abuse, unwanted sexual attention or threats and humiliating behaviour during the previous month.”

11 percent of workers answered the first had happened to them during this period, humiliating behaviour or threats 5 percent, and unwanted sexual attention 2 percent.

At the same time, the study shows women were twice as likely as men were to have received unwanted sexual attention.

Having been subjected to bullying, harassment, physical violence, and sexual harassment in the past year formed the next three questions.

This time, the results were 4 percent, 2 percent, and 1 percent, respectively. Women were three times as likely to have been subjected to sexual harassment as men were.

Reported levels of adverse social behaviour subjection at the time were lowest in Kosovo and Turkey – 3 and 5 percent, respectively – whilst Austria was highest with 22 percent, closely followed by Finland’s 21 percent.

Norway came third with about 20 percent. By gender, 18 percent of men and 22 percent of women said this had happened to them.

Why is violence higher in Norway than in relation to other countries, except France?

“We don’t really know. When looking at the report with its six indicators, it’s obviously a very serious and very real, true problem for them if they have said that,”, says Eurofound researcher Agnes Parent Thirion to The Foreigner. “Moreover, people in some countries and cultures are happier to tell strangers things.

What would you say the causes are?

“There are many reasons for violence and many theories. They can depend on the personality of the victim, the perpetrator, or both. It can also have something to do with the leadership style, work intensity, or collaboration climate within the worklplace.”

“There are, of course, cultural differences, but one cannot ignore the fact that something is happening in the workplace,” she concludes.




Published on Monday, 10th December, 2012 at 13:23 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 4th March 2013 at 15:10.

This post has the following tags: norwayworking, norwayviolenceatwork.





  
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