Norway Liberals liberate supermarket wine sales / News / The Foreigner

Norway Liberals liberate supermarket wine sales. Consumers fed up with having to enter the doors of government alcohol chain ‘Vinmonopolet’ may soon have something to raise their glasses to after the weekend’s events. It looks as though Norway might be moving towards a more (foreign) shopper-oriented alcohol policy just over five months before the general election. Last weekend’s national Party congress saw a majority vote in favour of wine and beer over 4.75 per cent alcohol by volume gracing the shelves of ordinary supermarkets and shops.

norwayalcoholsales, norwaydrinkinglaws



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Norway Liberals liberate supermarket wine sales

Published on Monday, 15th April, 2013 at 13:06 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 16th April 2013 at 12:29.

Consumers fed up with having to enter the doors of government alcohol chain ‘Vinmonopolet’ may soon have something to raise their glasses to after the weekend’s events.

Vinmonopolet Briskeby, Oslo (illus. ph.)
Vinmonopolet Briskeby, Oslo (illus. ph.)
Photo: © 2005,6, 7 Bjørn Erik Pedersen/Wikimedi


It looks as though Norway might be moving towards a more (foreign) shopper-oriented alcohol policy just over five months before the general election.

Last weekend’s national Party congress saw a majority vote in favour of wine and beer over 4.75 per cent alcohol by volume gracing the shelves of ordinary supermarkets and shops.

The wines got 127 to 94 against, whilst the exact beer figures are somewhat fuzzy, however.

Politicians also said ‘aye’ to removing state-imposed limits on opening and serving times, and allow alcoholic drink manufacturers to dispense information about the products on their homepages. Vinomonopolet has the Norway Internet monopoly today.

Liberal Youth leader Sveinung Rotevatn tells The Foreigner they still wish to keep alcohol taxes high because of the health and societal risks, but want a “sensible alcohol policy, where people don’t feel it makes their life difficult.”

“We believe in citizens taking responsibility for their own lives and that they can be trusted with the giant burden of being able to buy a bottle of stronger beer in a supermarket.”

“I’ve received many annoyed emails and phone calls from people who don’t see the point of having to stroll down the Vinmonopolet aisles in order to get a bottle of wine or this type of beer for their dinner,” adds Mr Rotevatn.

The vote for altered alcohol accessibility also comes following other Parties’ suggestions.

Progress (FrP) advocates unrestricted opening times for pubs and bars, and to lift the veil on beer supermarket sales from 8pm.  

Two leading Centre (Sp) politicians are slogging it out over drinking times, and Labour (Ap), the Socialist Left (SV), Conservatives (H) and Progress want Vinmonopolet open on Easter, Whitsun, Christmas, and New Year’s Eve days.

Only the Christian Democrats (KrF) want to retain today’s closed for religious reasons arrangement.

Sveinung Rotevatn also argues the pro-shop alcohol move is good regional policy.

“It’s ok for people who live in larger cities with a Vinmonopolet nearby, but several people have to drive several kilometres to reach their nearest one,” says the Liberal Youth Leader.

At the same time, the Norwegian government also levies considerable taxes on fuels and earns money on road tolls.




Published on Monday, 15th April, 2013 at 13:06 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 16th April 2013 at 12:29.

This post has the following tags: norwayalcoholsales, norwaydrinkinglaws.





  
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