Norway Libyan F-16s face recall / News / The Foreigner

Norway Libyan F-16s face recall. UPDATED: Norway’s tripartite coalition government is considering bringing its warplanes home from Libya at the end of the current tour of duty. Politicians from minority Party the Socialist Left (SV) initially supported the campaign, but later called for a debate about Norway’s bombing dilemma following joint statements by David Cameron, Barack Obama, and Nicolas Sarkozy advocating Gaddafi’s removal. They have also demanded answers to how Norway’s military role has panned out, but agreed a compromise by one vote at the weekend’s conference in Oslo “to take full responsibility for Norwegian military operations. We see the necessity for further military engagement,” international leader Petter Eide tells The Foreigner.

norwayf-16s, libyancampaign, muammaral-gaddafi, trygveslagsvoldvedum, pettereide, sveinroaldhansen, davidcameron, barackobama, nicolassarkozy



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Norway Libyan F-16s face recall

Published on Monday, 9th May, 2011 at 21:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 11th May 2011 at 13:39.

UPDATED: Norway’s tripartite coalition government is considering bringing its warplanes home from Libya at the end of the current tour of duty.

F-16 taking off from Souda Bay
F-16 taking off from Souda Bay
Photo: Forsvarets mediesenter/Lars Magne Hovtun


Staying the course

Politicians from minority Party the Socialist Left (SV) initially supported the campaign, but later called for a debate about Norway’s bombing dilemma following joint statements by David Cameron, Barack Obama, and Nicolas Sarkozy advocating Gaddafi’s removal.

They have also demanded answers to how Norway’s military role has panned out, but agreed a compromise by one vote at the weekend’s conference in Oslo “to take full responsibility for Norwegian military operations. We see the necessity for further military engagement,” international leader Petter Eide tells The Foreigner.

Other minority the Centre Party (Sp) has maintained almost complete silence regarding its support for the Allied operation, despite slight reservations.

In an email statement, Parliamentary leader Trygve Slagsvold Vedum says that, “Considering the signals that came from the Gaddafi regime in the days before the international community decided to act, we thought it necessary for the international community to intervene in order to stop Gaddafi from executing the threats that he voiced against his own people.”

“The UN Security Council’s Resolution 1973 constitutes a watershed in the international community’s willingness to act upon the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle. As a Party that supports both the UN and the R2P doctrine strongly, we felt it imperative to act upon such a historic decision by the UN Security Council. In the period before the Norwegian government decided to take part in the international operation in Libya we faced a series of scenarios, all of which were less than perfect. We deemed the least satisfying solution to be non-action,” he continues.

Big bucks, reduced contribution

Regarding a decision about Norway’s role after the end of the three months tour of duty, Labour’s (Ap) Vice-Chairman on the Parliamentary Standing Committee of Foreign Affairs, Svein Roald Hansen, says the Party will not commit before the June 24th cut-off date.

“It’s a little difficult to know how the situation in Libya really is, what with thousands of people affected and fighting between Gaddafi and rebel forces beginning to stall. The deadline is also still 5-6 weeks away, and I don’t see any problems surrounding our present participation.”

Whilst remaining non-committal, any future Norwegian military force could be smaller or different, according to Mr Hansen, because of the country’s current heavy commitment. Norway has released 247 bombs over Libya and spent approximately 130 million kroner to date.

“It’s too early to conclude because everyone agrees the solution, which lies in the political process, could be undermined.”

An equally vague Centrist Trygve Slagsvold Vedum states, “It is the situation on the ground that will guide the government’s further decisions on how long the international operation will last”.

Agreeing on this point, SV’s Petter Eide sees this as an opportunity to monitor the situation. He believes assessing the need for an air force is a challenge.

“We seek to see a withdrawal of Norwegian planes at the end of June if possible and have given clear signals about our fears Libya could turn out to be a long campaign like Afghanistan.”




Published on Monday, 9th May, 2011 at 21:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 11th May 2011 at 13:39.

This post has the following tags: norwayf-16s, libyancampaign, muammaral-gaddafi, trygveslagsvoldvedum, pettereide, sveinroaldhansen, davidcameron, barackobama, nicolassarkozy.





  
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