Norway military calm about further F-35 inferior modification round / News / The Foreigner

Norway military calm about further F-35 inferior modification round. Lockheed Martin may consider changes to the design that could alter the weight and speed of the aircraft. Military spokespersons remain unruffled. The proposed move is announced after yet another problem was found with one of the aircraft during an inspection. A cracked turbine blade on one plane was discovered last week, but tests have shown that this was a unique problem. The Pentagon grounded the entire fleet, but has now lifted the no-fly.

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Norway military calm about further F-35 inferior modification round

Published on Saturday, 2nd March, 2013 at 10:35 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 2nd March 2013 at 17:00.

Lockheed Martin may consider changes to the design that could alter the weight and speed of the aircraft. Military spokespersons remain unruffled.

F-35 in flight
F-35 in flight
Photo: Lockheed Martin/Flickr


The proposed move is announced after yet another problem was found with one of the aircraft during an inspection.

A cracked turbine blade on one plane was discovered last week, but tests have shown that this was a unique problem. The Pentagon grounded the entire fleet, but has now lifted the no-fly.

This is not the only fault found in with the F-35’s, in the past, irrespective of squabbles over spiraling costs. In 2011, problems with the helmet mounted display system, fuel dump subsystem, and electrical systems were discovered. There were also reports the plane’s radio did not work properly north of the Arctic Circle.

The Pentagon’s 2012 report also lists lowering the plane’s manoeuvring tolerance levels from 5.3G to 4.6G, and raising demands for the aircraft to accelerate past the sound barrier (between Mach 0.8 and 1.2) with eight seconds, making it slower.

Now, Lockheed Martin may have to put back fuel safety valves scrapped in 2008, also perhaps affecting speed and manoeuvrability. The same performance issue may crop up regarding the fire suppression equipment, Wired reports.

The Norwegian military’s Brigadier Morten Klever is unconcerned about the Pentagon’s findings, or about that the planes will be altered and be different to what Norway ordered.

“The annual report is a kind of exam you have to undergo every year and the proposed changes are unproblematic regarding Norwegian requirements. Noticing some problems whilst under a test programme is quite normal anyway,” he told Klassekampen.                                                                                      

Parliament is to consider the first F-35 purchase consignment’s size this spring. The government announced plans to buy an initial four for test purposes earlier in 2011.

For more F-35 articles on The Foreigner, click here.




Published on Saturday, 2nd March, 2013 at 10:35 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 2nd March 2013 at 17:00.

This post has the following tags: f-35, lockheedmartin, norwayf-35s.





  
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