Norway military foreigner-selective / News / The Foreigner

Norway military foreigner-selective. Some 1,000 Norwegian citizens with foreign origins have been turned down for compulsory first-time military service, reports say. The figure appears in Klassekampen. Generally-speaking, military service is essentially obligatory for all men and women of eighteen years of age upwards.

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Norway military foreigner-selective

Published on Friday, 17th October, 2014 at 22:37 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 21st October 2014 at 21:50.

Some 1,000 Norwegian citizens with foreign origins have been turned down for compulsory first-time military service, reports say.

A Norwegian army soldier
A Norwegian army soldier
Photo: Didrik Linnerud/Norwegian military media centre


The figure appears in Klassekampen.

Generally-speaking, military service is essentially obligatory for all men and women of eighteen years of age upwards.

Individuals can refuse on certain grounds under Norwegian legislation, “that conflict with their personal convictions” if serving forces them to go against values of fundamental importance to them.

These can be faith, ethically, or politically-based. Medicinal, social, or welfare reasons do not count, according to the application form to be excused from military service.

It also states that the person has to possess an inherently pacifist attitude and be against using weapons or violence against other human beings.

They must also disassociate themselves from others’ use of violence or weapons “as a method of conflict resolution except in the case of self-defence. It is conditional that this attitude is absolute and applies to any situation. This means that one must also disassociate oneself from the fact that Norway has an armed defence force,” it is written.

Otherwise, conscription for eligible Norwegian nationals proceeds as normal. New rules introduced last month are now creating problems for people with certain foreign origins, however.

“Previously, we had positions within the Armed Forces which did not require security clearance. This is not the situation within the Armed Forces today. Today, all soldiers must have a security clearance,” Major Vegard Finberg, press spokesperson for Chief of Defence Admiral Haakon Bruun-Hanssen tells The Foreigner.

The new procedures were introduced because the process gathering relevant information for the security clearance takes too long to perform, according to him. This applies to countries that Norway does not have security cooperation with.  

“As a result of this, there will be a lack of meaningful service for the soldier waiting for security clearance,” says Major Finberg. “This procedure is as a result of security laws, of course, not just one bright guy finding out it was a sensible thing to do. It’s been part of work on finding out how to handle the issue, work that has been going on for several years.”

How many countries does Norway not have security cooperation with?

“That’s classified information. What I can say is that there are many countries that we don’t have a security agreement with that make us carry out a background check on the person and/or their relatives.”

The Foreigner asked Norway’s National Security Authority (NSM) what procedures/type of procedures are used regarding security clearance for military service, levels these apply to, and how they differ from the old ones.

Officials say they are not able to comment on these questions over and above what is published on their website describing the security clearance process.

Facts:               

  • The NSM collects personal information in connection with about 35,000 security clearance cases per year.
  • Being given a security clearance means the person is regarded as being “sufficiently reliable, loyal, and with adequate powers of judgment to handle classified information in an acceptable way”.
  • A security clearance is normally valid for five years.
  • A person’s employer must then initiate the process to get them re-cleared if access to classified information is still required.



Published on Friday, 17th October, 2014 at 22:37 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 21st October 2014 at 21:50.

This post has the following tags: army, foreigners, norway, recruits, soldiers.





  
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