Norway ministers brief Parliament on 22 July / News / The Foreigner

Norway ministers brief Parliament on 22 July. The Minister of Justice and Minister of Defence gave the Norwegian Parliament a lengthy explanation today about events during and following Anders Behring Breivik’s twin attacks. A quick-talking Knut Storberget began his briefing by telling assembled politicians “it is important to give credit to those who were in action from the police, other emergency services, the military, other public employees, as well as voluntary organisations and people that took part on their own initiative.”Transport and communications He agreed questioning the Polices’ operation on the day was legitimate, saying openness, admitting, learning from, and improving upon possible mistakes should not wait.

andersbehringbreivik, 22julyattacksnorway, knutstorberget, gretefaremo



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Norway ministers brief Parliament on 22 July

Published on Thursday, 10th November, 2011 at 22:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

The Minister of Justice and Minister of Defence gave the Norwegian Parliament a lengthy explanation today about events during and following Anders Behring Breivik’s twin attacks.

Norwegian Parliament building
Norwegian Parliament building
Photo: Norwegian Parliament/Flickr


A quick-talking Knut Storberget began his briefing by telling assembled politicians “it is important to give credit to those who were in action from the police, other emergency services, the military, other public employees, as well as voluntary organisations and people that took part on their own initiative.”

Transport and communications

He agreed questioning the Polices’ operation on the day was legitimate, saying openness, admitting, learning from, and improving upon possible mistakes should not wait.

Declaring, “it may be difficult to answer many questions surrounding the attacks until the evaluations are completed”, he outlined, amongst other things, seven points that need to be focused upon. Moreover, “all actions must be assessed in real time and viewed in light of the information that was available for the operational crews there and then.”

The areas are preventing radicalisation and violent extremism, the Police Security Service’s (PST) methodology, police response time, communication within the emergency services, protection of vulnerable objects, cooperation between police and military, and caring for and monitoring the victims and their families.

Minister of Justice Storberget went on to affirm, “The [police] helicopter can be used as the overview or observation platform, including serious accidents, armedattacks and other serious crimes. The police helicopter has very limitedtransport capacity, and is not equippedfor or suited for armed response situations.”

Moreover, he touched on the problems with the police boat, quoting Nordre Buskerud Police District as saying, “The police did not have access to boats other than their own in the first hectic phase. There were many boats moored at the quayside where the police had their meeting point, several of which they attempted to hot-wire, but the boats were well secured by their owners. Therefore, police did not succeed in using these boats.”

Moving on to police emergency line and other communication problems on Utøya, the Minister of Justice highlighted the urgent need to complete construction of the new national emergency service network.

“The analogue connections and communications did not function optimally. Traffic was extremely high and the capacity to receive and process the distress message was a challenge.”

Timing

He also confirmed two separate police emergency operations centres received Breivik’s calls stating he wanted to surrender, but could not ring him back as previously reported.

“Police tried to gatheras much information as possible fromthe perpetrator, but there was little indication that he intended to surrender at the times he called. This is supported by the fact that a rapid-fire sequence was heard during the emergency calls immediately after the first request by the offender to surrender. The second request was called in shortly before his arrest,” quoted the minister from Nordre Buskerud police logs.

Perhaps the most surprising element of today’s account was news Anders Behring Breivik was arrested at a different time than originally reported. Oslo Police District said this occurred at 18:27, but Nordre Buskerud officers state it was between 5 and 7 minutes later.

Talking of the need for a new emergency preparedness centre in Oslo, the minister also echoed PST concerns that extreme Islamists still pose the greatest threat against Norway.

“We see that these communities have increased their support after 22 July, probably as a result of hostile anti-immigration actions,” he said.

The centre will be used to coordinate with several agencies to help combat terror.

Shake-up

Police had requested assistance from the military five times. In her address, Defence Minister Grete Faremo said, “it became clear that we were facing very serious criminal acts early on, and that the main responsibility for dealing with the situation, therefore, lay with the police. The Armed Forces' task was thus toassist the police in the best possible way.”

She also touched on problems with helicopter readiness.

“The military maintained preparedness with helicopters based at Rygge until the summer of 2009. Upon request, this could also assist police with administrative transport and enforcement support.”

However, it was then decided to extend medical support in Afghanistan, which she said the government consulted Parliament about, as it would reduce the capacity in Norway.

“The discontinuation of preparedness at Rygge, and that the military would no longer have helicopters at any one time that would be ready within a given standby time was subsequently made clear.”

Personnel were called in approximately one hour and after Breivik’s bomb exploded but were not ready at the time. Police were informed the helicopters “would be made available for police as quickly as possible.”

According to the minister, they took off from Rygge at 18:57, 19:18, and 19:37. Preparedness has now been strengthened.

“The military provides what it has of relevant resources when police ask for support. We are now reviewing instructions to see if any procedures can be simplified further,” she says in a press statement.

After the accounts, Opposition politicians had a chance to address Parliament over the terror attacks.




Published on Thursday, 10th November, 2011 at 22:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, 22julyattacksnorway, knutstorberget, gretefaremo.





  
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