Norway-Morris hearing scheduled / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway-Morris hearing scheduled. Tobacco giant Philip Morris is to meet the Norwegian state in Oslo District Court to contest its ban on displaying tobacco products. Norwegian researchers argue the veto, which came into force on 01 January last year, has led to fewer smokers and a reduction in tobacco sales. Nevertheless, Philip Morris Norway (PMN) claims it contravenes the EEA agreement, limiting free movement of goods within the area. A recent EFTA Court ruling states it could contravene the Agreement, even though it may have possible short-term health effects.

philipmorris, norwegianstatecourtcase



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Norway-Morris hearing scheduled

Published on Tuesday, 27th September, 2011 at 11:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Tobacco giant Philip Morris is to meet the Norwegian state in Oslo District Court to contest its ban on displaying tobacco products.



Norwegian researchers argue the veto, which came into force on 01 January last year, has led to fewer smokers and a reduction in tobacco sales.

Nevertheless, Philip Morris Norway (PMN) claims it contravenes the EEA agreement, limiting free movement of goods within the area. A recent EFTA Court ruling states it could contravene the Agreement, even though it may have possible short-term health effects.

“A visual display ban on tobacco products, imposed by national legislation of an EEA State, such as the one at issue in the case at hand, constitutes a measure having equivalent effect to a quantitative restriction on imports within the meaning of Article 11 EEA if, in fact, the ban affects the marketing of products imported from other EEA States to a greater degree than that of imported products which were, until recently, produced in Norway under Article 13,” states the Court.

Norwegian government lawyer Kjetil Bøe Moen, representing the state on behalf of the Ministry of Health and Care Services, tells Nationen, “We believe our case has good grounds for reasons of health. I cannot see the EFTA Court’s advice changes anything in relation to our case.”

The court case is due to start in December.



Published on Tuesday, 27th September, 2011 at 11:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: philipmorris, norwegianstatecourtcase.





  
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