Norway oil policy complaints revealed / News / The Foreigner

Norway oil policy complaints revealed. The Government, Centre Party (Sp) Petroleum and Energy Minister Ola Borten Moe and his predecessor Terje Riis-Johansen (Sp) are under fire from Norway’s press following claims they tried to conceal a bid for legislation from Parliament for over two years. In 2009, the European Union wrote to Norwegian government officials requesting they alter current oil policy. The practice greatly increases costs for producers, forcing companies to establish local offices in areas near oil fields in a bid to create more regional industry and work. By creating more jobs the policy has increased employment prospects and local economy in Arctic towns such as Hammerfest, where companies including Statoil, France Total, GDF Suez, Hess and German company RWE Dea own a liquefied natural gas plant.

olabortenmoe, terjeriis-johansen, esa, eftasurveillanceauthority, oillawchanges



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Norway oil policy complaints revealed

Published on Tuesday, 31st May, 2011 at 23:54 under the news category, by Kyle Blythe.
Last Updated on 9th May 2014 at 08:16.

The Government, Centre Party (Sp) Petroleum and Energy Minister Ola Borten Moe and his predecessor Terje Riis-Johansen (Sp) are under fire from Norway’s press following claims they tried to conceal a bid for legislation from Parliament for over two years.

Downtown Hammerfest
Local economy and employment benefit from the Government's oil policyDowntown Hammerfest
Photo: Christopher Jensen/Flickr


In 2009, the European Union wrote to Norwegian government officials requesting they alter current oil policy. The practice greatly increases costs for producers, forcing companies to establish local offices in areas near oil fields in a bid to create more regional industry and work.

By creating more jobs the policy has increased employment prospects and local economy in Arctic towns such as Hammerfest, where companies including Statoil, France Total, GDF Suez, Hess and German company RWE Dea own a liquefied natural gas plant.

The recent revelations only came to light in the press after Aftenposten gained access to a letter sent to the National Ombudsman by the Government. It warns against the release of a complaint registered over two years ago from the EFTA Surveillance Authority (ESA) regarding the Oil Law (Petroleumsloven).

According to the letter, “Access to the document in question from ESA could lead to press coverage of the case or mention of it by others, and it was politically important for the government to prevent this."

“This is particularly important for the sake of Party groups in parliament, which could easily get a false impression of the case if it was wrongly or indiscriminately spoken about publicly before the matter was agreed between the Ministry and the ESA on a solution," it further reads.

In response to Aftenposten’s article, the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy refutes the claim it had “put a lid” on the requirement, writing in a press statement that, “This is incorrect. Parliament was informed in the usual way through the presentation of Prop. 102 L "Changes to the Act." once it became clear that ESA maintained the wording of the clause had to be changed.”

Changes to the policy are now to be considered under a full Parliamentary sitting on the 9th June.



Published on Tuesday, 31st May, 2011 at 23:54 under the news category, by Kyle Blythe.
Last updated on 9th May 2014 at 08:16.

This post has the following tags: olabortenmoe, terjeriis-johansen, esa, eftasurveillanceauthority, oillawchanges.





  
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