Norway pessimistic to UN Cancun Climate Change Summit / News / The Foreigner

Norway pessimistic to UN Cancun Climate Change Summit. Norway continues its climate change policy commitments, amid slow-paced greenhouse emission talks during the COP16 in Cancun. The conference in Mexico is less ambitious than last year’s Copenhagen COP15 agreement, but is projected as a discussion platform for a potential continuation to the Kyoto agreement. There are also no expectations the summit will produce a common accord, but delegates hope to reach decisions in certain areas such as forest preservation, funding, and technology, that together could form a framework for a new climate agreement.

cop16, cancun, mexico, un, climate, summit, jens, stoltenberg, kyoto, protocol, greenhouse, gases, change



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Norway pessimistic to UN Cancun Climate Change Summit

Published on Tuesday, 30th November, 2010 at 12:16 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.
Last Updated on 30th November 2010 at 13:42.

Norway continues its climate change policy commitments, amid slow-paced greenhouse emission talks during the COP16 in Cancun.

Opening ceremony COP16
Opening ceremony COP16
Photo: COP16


Power game

The conference in Mexico is less ambitious than last year’s Copenhagen COP15 agreement, but is projected as a discussion platform for a potential continuation to the Kyoto agreement.

There are also no expectations the summit will produce a common accord, but delegates hope to reach decisions in certain areas such as forest preservation, funding, and technology, that together could form a framework for a new climate agreement.

However, Bård Lahn, climate advisor at Friends of the Earth Norway (Naturvernforbundet), was mildly pessimistic, given that each of the 192 participating countries has their own agenda, as well as the current world balance of power.

“Both the U.S. and China see this as a strategic game of power. It would be very unfortunate if the rivalry between them marks the meeting," he tells NTB.

The perspective of states committing themselves to lower gas emissions is not viable, especially since UN member states can veto a common agreement, according to Canada’s chief negotiator Guy Saint-Jacques.

“I find it's a very frustrating process, because it means you're not working on a consensus basis, you're working on unanimity basis […] Any country can block the discussions at any time," he told Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail last week.

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg, who will be participating next week,has also expressed pessimism about the summit’s result.

The world’s population is going to increase dramatically at the same time that emissions are to be reduced. [Solutions to both] must be found, but this is extremely difficult because most countries fear the fight against poverty will be hindered by climate measures,” he said during his speech at last week’s ZERO Climate Conference in Oslo.  

Post-Kyoto era?

The Prime Minister also said he believes Norway is one of the countries who should continue its efforts to take responsibility for gas emissions and climate change, regardless of whether or not it is under the umbrella of the UN.

“We must try to develop cooperation between groups of countries in anticipation of a new, major, and binding international agreement, for example, between the Nordic and some developing countries on sectoral climate action.”

However, Norway and the EU are the only ones that will to continue lowering gas emissions efforts after the end of the Kyoto Protocol in 2012 as of now. Canada, Japan and Russia remain uncommitted to any future agreement.

Bård Lahn of Earth Norway warns about the implications of dismissing the Kyoto Protocol.

“It is the only binding agreement, and an important symbol showing that rich countries keep their promises. […] Norway and the EU should not go ahead with ambitious commitments, than to accept a bad deal," he told NTB.

Audun Rosland, who is Norway’s chief negotiator at the Summit, believes this will be the delegates’ toughest challenges.

“We need to clear up what will happen to the Kyoto Protocol after its expiry. We will probably not reach this goal in Cancun, but at least hope for a political declaration of intent," he says.

The COP16 Summit ends on 10 December.





Published on Tuesday, 30th November, 2010 at 12:16 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.
Last updated on 30th November 2010 at 13:42.

This post has the following tags: cop16, cancun, mexico, un, climate, summit, jens, stoltenberg, kyoto, protocol, greenhouse, gases, change.





  
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