Norway pets become big business / News / The Foreigner

Norway pets become big business. Pet owners in Norway are willing to pay considerable sums to treat their four-legged or other furry friends, reports suggest. Insurance company Gjensidige estimates their policies are sold for approximately 350 million kroner, and another company, Agria, is experiencing strong growth.  It is believed about 150,000 pets currently hold insurance in Norway, with an increase for dogs from 25 percent a few years ago, to up to 40 now. Agria’s Christian Geelmuyden explains to Aftenposten that, “Animals’ status, not least cats, has been lifted.”

norwaypets, vetsinnorway



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Norway pets become big business

Published on Friday, 2nd March, 2012 at 09:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Pet owners in Norway are willing to pay considerable sums to treat their four-legged or other furry friends, reports suggest.

Puppy Great Dane - 2 months
Puppy Great Dane - 2 months
Photo: Eric Isselee/Shutterstock Images


Insurance company Gjensidige estimates their policies are sold for approximately 350 million kroner, and another company, Agria, is experiencing strong growth. 

It is believed about 150,000 pets currently hold insurance in Norway, with an increase for dogs from 25 percent a few years ago, to up to 40 now. Agria’s Christian Geelmuyden explains to Aftenposten that, “Animals’ status, not least cats, has been lifted.”

Better personal economy, feelings, and sentimental value are amongst the reasons for the growth in sales.

“People used to think paying 10,000 kroner for treating their pet was a fortune, now, few bat an eyelid at bills of over 30,000,” says Oslo Smådyrklinnik’s Monica Heggelund, general manager of Norway’s largest domestic pet veterinary practice.

Conditions are different in oil-rich county Rogaland, however. 

“Fees are almost no problem if everyone buys the insurance policy we recommend, but people think twice if they have to pay themselves,” one Stavanger-based animal doctor tells The Foreigner.

Whilst treatments start at 1,000 kroner, “fixing a broken leg, for example, can cost between 10,000 and 15,000 kroner depending on the operating procedure and severity, which is not that much.”




Published on Friday, 2nd March, 2012 at 09:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwaypets, vetsinnorway.





  
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