Norway plastic Christmas trees popular / News / The Foreigner

Norway plastic Christmas trees popular. As Norway continues to be ’gripped’ by a national butter shortage, people are buying artificial Christmas trees in their thousands. “We have sold all of the most authentic-looking plastic trees, and I haven’t got much to show customers coming into our shop now. These types of trees cost about 2,000 kroner, and we’re already sold out before Advent,” Sveinung Nydal, assistant manager at Plantasjen in Førde municipality, tells NRK. Sales are up 15 percent on last year. The 15,000 fake trees sold have an approximately 15 percent market share.

norwaychristmastrees, plastictrees, artificialchristmastreesnorway



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Norway plastic Christmas trees popular

Published on Wednesday, 21st December, 2011 at 09:48 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

As Norway continues to be ’gripped’ by a national butter shortage, people are buying artificial Christmas trees in their thousands.

Christmas tree decorations (illus. ph.)
Christmas tree decorations (illus. ph.)
Photo: Andy Melton/Flickr


“We have sold all of the most authentic-looking plastic trees, and I haven’t got much to show customers coming into our shop now. These types of trees cost about 2,000 kroner, and we’re already sold out before Advent,” Sveinung Nydal, assistant manager at Plantasjen in Førde municipality, tells NRK.

Sales are up 15 percent on last year. The 15,000 fake trees sold have an approximately 15 percent market share.

There are many types of models available, and customers can arrange the branches to suit their own taste, with or without tinsel et al.

Whilst some people buy them because they suffer from allergies, or are asthmatic, convenience is also a major factor.

The Norwegian Society for the Conservation of Nature encourages non-allergic and asthma-free customers to think of the environment instead.

“We would like people to have Norwegian spruce or pine trees. These are grown out in the woods where they belong,” says Arnodd Håpnes.

However, Plantasjen Førde’s Dag Jonson maintains, “I haven’t thought about that they are made of plastic, but what is practical, rather.”



Published on Wednesday, 21st December, 2011 at 09:48 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwaychristmastrees, plastictrees, artificialchristmastreesnorway.





  
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