Norway PM’s climate expectations low / News / The Foreigner

Norway PM’s climate expectations low. Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg hopes climate negotiations will not flounder at Durban’s UN Climate Summit but is unoptimistic. Having followed international climate negotiations since 1992, he says, “I cannot remember a climate summit where expectations have been as low as they are at the moment. Right now, the goal is simply that the talks should not break down.” The PM will be moderating key discussions this week about economic measures tackling the effects of climate change as part of his southern hemisphere trip. He feels the Kyoto Protocol has to be continued to at least 2015.

globalco2emissions, globalclimatechange, ciceronorway, durbancop17cmp7



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Norway PM’s climate expectations low

Published on Monday, 5th December, 2011 at 20:59 under the news category, by John Price and Michael Sandelson      .

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg hopes climate negotiations will not flounder at Durban’s UN Climate Summit but is unoptimistic.

Durban, South Africa
Durban, South Africa
Photo: Adamina/Flickr


Having followed international climate negotiations since 1992, he says, “I cannot remember a climate summit where expectations have been as low as they are at the moment. Right now, the goal is simply that the talks should not break down.”

The PM will be moderating key discussions this week about economic measures tackling the effects of climate change as part of his southern hemisphere trip. He feels the Kyoto Protocol has to be continued to at least 2015.

“To achieve this, other major countries like USA, China, India and Brazil must commit to a time schedule for the purpose of an agreement in 2015 that also includes them. Moreover, these countries must commit to emissions reductions,” PM Stoltenberg tells NRK.

EU Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard is also concerned for the summit, according to NTB. She declares, “It's tempting to say that it is hopeless,”

All focus is on the Kyoto Protocol deal that expires next year, and little progress has been made.

“The climate negotiations are going along one step at a time, and never seem to propel forward. People are adopting a wait-and-see policy,” Glen Peters, at the Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research Oslo (CICERO), tells The Foreigner.

According to him, “It’s a bit like a poker game. Everyone is holding their cards close to their chest. Nevertheless, global emissions are increasing the whole time.”

In keeping with the Norwegian Prime Minister, Mr Peters also believes the Durban COP17/CMP7 will prove to be inconclusive.

“It’s good to be optimistic, but it will probably be a case of ‘come back next year’,” he says.

To avoid exceeding the two-degree target by 2020, set at COP15 in Copenhagen 2009, where PM Stoltenberg was given a key role, Mr Peters suggests, “Every country, rich or poor, does the best it can to reduce emissions. We are all living on one planet.”



Published on Monday, 5th December, 2011 at 20:59 under the news category, by John Price and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: globalco2emissions, globalclimatechange, ciceronorway, durbancop17cmp7.





  
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