Norway polar bear victim’s sanctuary built / News / The Foreigner

Norway polar bear victim’s sanctuary built. Horatio Chapple was known as “a fine young gentleman with amazing potential”. His story continues to lives on through Horatio’s Garden, a sanctuary for spinal treatment patients. In the school holidays, Horatio Chapple was a volunteer at the Duke of Cornwall Spinal Treatment Centre in Salisbury. Horatio and his father, orthopedic and spinal surgeon David Chapple decided on a garden which would allow patients along with families an area of tranquility and peace. Horatio conducted research which identified the patients’ needs for a garden as they were confined inside and needed a release from the constant indoors. Thus the idea of a garden was born. The idea was then followed by Horatio’s questionnaire, allowing patients the chance to establish what they desired from the garden, therefore.

svalbard, polarbear, attack, britishschoolsexploringsociety, casualties



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Norway polar bear victim’s sanctuary built

Published on Wednesday, 9th July, 2014 at 12:11 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 9th July 2014 at 12:25.

Horatio Chapple was known as “a fine young gentleman with amazing potential”. His story continues to lives on through Horatio’s Garden, a sanctuary for spinal treatment patients.

Opening of Horatio's Garden
Horation's Garden welcomed some of its supporters 48 hours after the patients' preview.Opening of Horatio's Garden
Photo: With kind permission of The Charity


In the school holidays, Horatio Chapple was a volunteer at the Duke of Cornwall Spinal Treatment Centre in Salisbury. Horatio and his father, orthopedic and spinal surgeon David Chapple decided on a garden which would allow patients along with families an area of tranquility and peace.

Horatio conducted research which identified the patients’ needs for a garden as they were confined inside and needed a release from the constant indoors. Thus the idea of a garden was born. The idea was then followed by Horatio’s questionnaire, allowing patients the chance to establish what they desired from the garden, therefore.

Built from the donations given in memory of Horatio Chapple, the garden opened in September 2012 and was designed to benefit patients during their stay in hospital. Patients were given a private viewing of the garden before the official opening. This was received positively as both men and women were filled with immediate joy, and there was a release from the unpleasant sighting of the white ceilings in the hospital.

A team of volunteers described by Horatio’s family as “the key part” of the project built the garden. A Head Gardener and volunteers who are called Horatio’s Garden Friends maintain the garden. A team of 40 volunteers transformed what was a plain piece of ground outside the entrance to the Spinal Treatment Centre into a aesthetically pleasing and blossoming environment.

The garden is filled with over 2,500 plants that decorate it, Low limestone walls represent the form of the spine which divide the planted beds and can also double up as seating. The garden paths are wide enough for a spinal injury patient to be wheeled along while still in a hospital bed, allowing patients who are physically disabled the same opportunities to experience the gardens true beauty.

Cleve West, who designed the garden, has seven RHS gold medals and has won the Best in Show award at the Chelsea Flower Show in 2011 and 2012.

The garden remains a tribute and reminder of Horatio. Its success has now led to Horatio’s Garden becoming an independent charity which will continue to create beautiful gardens in spinal injury centres across the UK. A further step organizing therapeutic and fun activities that patients can enjoy in the comfort of the gardens is planned.

Horatio’s mother Olivia said “Horatio’s Garden is a symbol of love, kindness and courage. These were qualities which Horatio had, which I treasure and miss and will remember forever. We hope it will inspire all who use it.”

At his funeral, his mother read from her speech that Horatio was “working on his personal statement when he left for Svalbard”.

'His last sentence read: "I am so certain that medicine is the career for me as it will give me the opportunity to pursue lifelong learning about a subject that fascinates me and will result in me ultimately helping people." in medicine so he could ultimately help people.

Horatio died at the age of 17 in August 2011 after a polar bear attacked the camp he and others were staying at on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen in the Arctic region’s Svalbard.



Published on Wednesday, 9th July, 2014 at 12:11 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 9th July 2014 at 12:25.

This post has the following tags: svalbard, polarbear, attack, britishschoolsexploringsociety, casualties.





  
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