Norway police focus on extremism, hate crimes / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway police focus on extremism, hate crimes. Norwegian police give seven new personnel responsibility to intensify the fight against radicalization and violent extremism. Hate crimes are another focus area. The new officers will be assigned to, and have duties regarding the Østfold, Romerike, Søndre Buskerud, Asker og Bærum, Hordaland, and Telemark og Oslo police districts. Norwegian police say concern about terror threats is increasing. Therefore, special efforts regarding youths will be put into detecting people on the verge of being radicalized.

extremism, hate, bullying, violence, terror



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Norway police focus on extremism, hate crimes

Published on Friday, 19th September, 2014 at 15:04 under the news category, by Martyna Kwaśniewska.

Norwegian police give seven new personnel responsibility to intensify the fight against radicalization and violent extremism. Hate crimes are another focus area.



The new officers will be assigned to, and have duties regarding the Østfold, Romerike, Søndre Buskerud, Asker og Bærum, Hordaland, and Telemark og Oslo police districts.

Norwegian police say concern about terror threats is increasing. Therefore, special efforts regarding youths will be put into detecting people on the verge of being radicalized.

NRK reports that new officers’ work would not relate to people with a particular ethnic background, however.

The newly employed police officers will monitor the situation in youth groups and will cooperate closely with municipalities regarding their prevention activities.

Municipalities in which people returning from countries abroad involved with hostilities reside will be notified.

The new move comes in addition to establishing a so-termed anti-hate crime group for Oslo at the beginning of this month.

This group based at Manglerud Police Station trains officers in the Norwegian capital, as well as investigates and follows cases up.

Police personnel will also cooperate with personnel working within environments for people particularly exposed to hate crime such as religious organizations.

The organizations also include the LGBT Knowledge Centre - National Centre for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, Pink Expertise – an educational program developed by LLH (National Association for lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender people – and the Equality and Anti-discrimination Ombudsman.

According to Manglerud Police Station Commander Janne Stømner, 55 cases of hate crime in Oslo were reported to them in 2013.

She believes that a real number, including these unreported incidents, is higher, however. Ethnicity and sexual orientation are the most common reasons for being harassed.




Published on Friday, 19th September, 2014 at 15:04 under the news category, by Martyna Kwaśniewska.

This post has the following tags: extremism, hate, bullying, violence, terror.





  
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