Norway Progress dismisses pro-Kyoto 2 agreement vote / News / The Foreigner

Norway Progress dismisses pro-Kyoto 2 agreement vote. Rightists the Progress Party have decided to vote against the Kyoto 2 agreement. As the Party’s Environment Policy Spokesman Per-Willy Amundsen calls it ‘symbolic politics’, concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere have never been higher. Kyoto 2 would see Norway commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent in the 2008 to 2013 period in comparison to 1990s emissions. The Conservative Party (H), Liberals (H), and Christian Democrats (KrF) have all agreed to support the proposals, Progress (FrP) decided to discuss the issue with their parliamentary group first. This resulted in the decision to vote against.

kyoto2, co2emissions, climatechange, globalwarming



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Norway Progress dismisses pro-Kyoto 2 agreement vote

Published on Wednesday, 5th June, 2013 at 20:59 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 6th June 2013 at 11:27.

Rightists the Progress Party have decided to vote against the Kyoto 2 agreement. As the Party’s Environment Policy Spokesman Per-Willy Amundsen calls it ‘symbolic politics’, concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere have never been higher.

Per-Willy Amundsen, Climate Policy spokesperson
Mr Amundsen completely agrees a global climate treaty is pointless with less than 15 per cent of global emissions forming part of the Kyoto 2 dealPer-Willy Amundsen, Climate Policy spokesperson
Photo: The Progress Party


Kyoto 2 would see Norway commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent in the 2008 to 2013 period in comparison to 1990s emissions.

The Conservative Party (H), Liberals (H), and Christian Democrats (KrF) have all agreed to support the proposals, Progress (FrP) decided to discuss the issue with their parliamentary group first. This resulted in the decision to vote against.

“It’s sad and shameful that Norway's second largest Party in Parliament can think of making such a decision,” Silje Lundberg, leader of environmental organisation Young Friends of the Earth Norway told NRK, Wednesday.

The Progress Party also voted against the 2008 cross-Party climate political compromise, known as ‘klimaforliket’.

Per-Willy Amundsen stressed, Wednesday, that the Party is not against an international climate agreement but believes large industrial countries should be involved, highlighting that both China and the US have chosen to remain out of the Kyoto agreement.

“[Prime Minister] Jens [Stoltenberg] has stated that a global climate treaty is pointless when less than 15 per cent of global emissions form part of the deal. I completely agree. Why should Norwegian businesses have costly special requirements that will lead to Norwegian jobs being moved to China and other countries that are not part of the agreement?” he declared on the Party’s website.

In other climate news today, researchers have found that CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere are at an all-time high.

Measurements from facilities in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, and at Hawaii’s Mauna Loa in the Pacific, show levels breach the IPCC’s (International Climate Panel on Climate Change) symbolic but important 400 ppm (parts per million) barrier.

These are shown for the fifth month in a row. The UN’s IPCC has linked this to the two-degree global warming target agreed at the 2009’s COP15 Climate Summit in Copenhagen.

Norway’s government released its climate whitepaper just over a year ago, vowing to take measures to cut Norway’s emissions and make it a low emissions society by the middle of the 21st Century in keeping with this target.

The Scandinavian country came 15th in 2012’s Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI), dropping to 31st overall in this year’s.

Cathrine Lunde Myhre, senior researcher at NILU (Norwegian Institute for Air Research), predicts their “prognoses indicate the world [CO2 concentration average] will pass 400 in 2016.”

“Emissions are not just increasing, but the growth rate has increased since 2000,” said Knut Alfsen at CICERO (Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research – Oslo). “So we’re accelerating through a barrier that we should have stopped at.”

Environmental organisation Zero has said they believe a five-degree rise in the earth’s temperature would lead to global chaos.

Yesterday, research company TNS Gallup’s Climate Barometer for 2013 showed that Norwegians do not think they will feel the consequences of climate change but believe other parts of the world will be affected.

Just 17 per cent of voters surveyed disagreed that climate change is man-made, with only 41 per cent of Progress Party ones agreeing that it is.




Published on Wednesday, 5th June, 2013 at 20:59 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 6th June 2013 at 11:27.

This post has the following tags: kyoto2, co2emissions, climatechange, globalwarming.





  
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