Norway psychiatric legislation changes proposed / News / The Foreigner

Norway psychiatric legislation changes proposed. Norwegian officials have put forward changes to the country’s Mental Health Act to provide different levels of security for different types of patients. “The current act implies a too great a risk for escape, hostage-taking and severe violence against patients and staff in the health institutions where particular dangerous patients stay,” said Minister of Health and Care services, Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen in a statement. “There is no distinction between different levels of security. The Government wishes to correct these shortcomings,” she continued.

norwaymentalhealthact, andersbehringbreivik



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Norway psychiatric legislation changes proposed

Published on Sunday, 13th May, 2012 at 09:54 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Norwegian officials have put forward changes to the country’s Mental Health Act to provide different levels of security for different types of patients.

Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen
'The current July 22 case has highlighted the need for this type of legislation'Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen
Photo: Ministry of Health and Care


“The current act implies a too great a risk for escape, hostage-taking and severe violence against patients and staff in the health institutions where particular dangerous patients stay,” said Minister of Health and Care services, Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen in a statement.

“There is no distinction between different levels of security. The Government wishes to correct these shortcomings,” she continued.

The proposal would allow patients to be searched as well as controlling the amount of communication they had. It would not change the length of time a convicted person would be subjected to compulsory treatment.

The government also wants to establish a unit with a high level of security that could be located within a prison.
These types of changes have been suggested in preparation for the end of Anders Behring Breivk’s trial due to his possible conviction to receive psychiatric treatment.

Anders Behring Breivik’s acts also led to former Police Security Service (PST) Director, Janne Kristiansen calling for changes to be made to the terror laws last November.

Minister Strøm-Erichsen declared in the press release, “The case against the terror suspect of July 22, currently in preparation before the courts, has highlighted the need for this type of legislation.”

“An eventual conviction to compulsory mental health care must be carried out in a specialist health institution and the transfer must take place "immediately" after the final sentence. The Parliament should be given the opportunity to adopt the necessary legislation before summer, so that security can be put in place as quickly as possible.”

The government also proposes establishing a national coordination unit to keep track of those who are sentenced to compulsory psychiatric care.




Published on Sunday, 13th May, 2012 at 09:54 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: norwaymentalhealthact, andersbehringbreivik.





  
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