Norway radon-accident death rate equal / News / The Foreigner

Norway radon-accident death rate equal. It is believed that around 300 Norwegians die each year form lung cancer caused by exposure to radon gas. This is the same number of people that are killed in traffic accidents. Radon is a colourless, odourless, and tasteless radioactive gas and is considered a health hazard. Egil Bjørløw from Stavanger council thinks that there are thousands of houses in the area that have high reading of Radon gas. Readings are made using detectors placed in the home for at least two months over winter.

radonnorway, stavangermunicipalityradonchart



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Norway radon-accident death rate equal

Published on Tuesday, 8th May, 2012 at 08:50 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

It is believed that around 300 Norwegians die each year form lung cancer caused by exposure to radon gas. This is the same number of people that are killed in traffic accidents.

Radon test kit (1988, illus. ph.)
Radon test kit (1988, illus. ph.)
Photo: National Institutes of Health/W, Commons


Radon is a colourless, odourless, and tasteless radioactive gas and is considered a health hazard.

Egil Bjørløw from Stavanger council thinks that there are thousands of houses in the area that have high reading of Radon gas. Readings are made using detectors placed in the home for at least two months over winter.

Measurements taken in Rogaland have found that all municipalities, excluding Karmøy and Egersund were producing higher readings of Radon gas than the recommended levels.

Municipalities have the information stored, and Mr Bjørlow says to NRK that Stavanger officials would like to publicise this on the Internet, “but we are the Data Inspectorate doesn’t allow us to.”

“We would like to see privacy laws revised as it’s either all or nothing for now”, the authority’s head of information Ove Skåra tells The Foreigner.

“We wouldn’t find it a problem if municipalities publish details about the areas, but don’t want information released about individual houses because of the highly variable quality of data provided by the companies that carry out radon measuring.”

At the same time, members of the public can obtain the information if they call the Radiation Protection Authority’s (NRPA).

“The information is publicly available, and most common place to obtain it is at the local municipality office. There may have been a misunderstanding by Stavanger municipality in this case,” declares Per Strand, head of department.



Published on Tuesday, 8th May, 2012 at 08:50 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

This post has the following tags: radonnorway, stavangermunicipalityradonchart.





  
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