Norway Rightists say ‘no time, gentlemen, please’ / News / The Foreigner

Norway Rightists say ‘no time, gentlemen, please’. The Progress Party (FrP) emphasises the next parliamentary period is ripe for a more consumer-friendly alcohol policy. As foreign and domestic tourists and nationals wonder what and earth is going on when meeting governmental alcohol policy, the Right-wingers want municipality-decided unrestricted opening times for pubs and bars. Politicians also wish ordinary supermarkets to sell beer as long as they are open, removing the beer curtains that are drawn around the drink at 8pm sharp.

norwaydrinkinglaws, alcohol, tax



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Norway Rightists say ‘no time, gentlemen, please’

Published on Friday, 11th January, 2013 at 09:30 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The Progress Party (FrP) emphasises the next parliamentary period is ripe for a more consumer-friendly alcohol policy.

All kinds of beers
All kinds of beers
Photo: Silvio Tanaka/Flickr


As foreign and domestic tourists and nationals wonder what and earth is going on when meeting governmental alcohol policy, the Right-wingers want municipality-decided unrestricted opening times for pubs and bars.

Politicians also wish ordinary supermarkets to sell beer as long as they are open, removing the beer curtains that are drawn around the drink at 8pm sharp.

The moves, which include allowing 18-year-olds to buy spirits, form part of the Party’s new programme proposal.

Present legislation bars establishments from selling wine and beer to under-18s, with consumers of spirits having to be a minimum of 20 years old.

Deputy Progress leader Per Sandberg says these proposals are nothing particularly new when it comes to the Party’s alcohol policy really.

However, they “are more detailed, because we see the tourism industry is struggling with state regulations when it comes to opening hours.”

The Christian Democrats (KrF), who may form part of a quad-partite Rightist coalition if current government loses this year’s elections, are concerned about Progress’ proposal in light of this.

“It goes against our policy, which is to tighten serving times,” Laila Dåvøy tells NRK, calling the liberalisation “unwise”.

“This is for the simple reason that the more one increases the supply, the more people drink more alcohol, which in turn increases the amount of alcohol-related damage there is. This is a step in entirely the wrong direction,” she declares.

The government recently increased taxes on beer up to 4.7 alc/vol by a further 1.9 percent in its draft national budget 2013 proposal.




Published on Friday, 11th January, 2013 at 09:30 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwaydrinkinglaws, alcohol, tax.





  
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