Norway road officials pilot anti-moose fatality device / News / The Foreigner

Norway road officials pilot anti-moose fatality device. 15,000 collisions between vehicles and moose have been recorded since 2009. Norwegian road officials are trying to reduce the rate with a new device, reports say. Many of the animals who survive the collisions will suffer from injuries and must be euthanized to prevent any further pain. Drivers can also be hit and badly injured following the impact as the animal’s body comes through the windscreen. Moreover, there is the major cost of vehicle replacements or repairs.

moose, norway, elk, deaths, driving



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Norway road officials pilot anti-moose fatality device

Published on Tuesday, 27th May, 2014 at 21:06 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 27th May 2014 at 21:35.

15,000 collisions between vehicles and moose have been recorded since 2009. Norwegian road officials are trying to reduce the rate with a new device, reports say.

Moose crossing sign, Norway
This road sign may be replaced by more efficient ones in the future.Moose crossing sign, Norway
Photo: Morten Normann Almeland/Shutterstock Ima


Many of the animals who survive the collisions will suffer from injuries and must be euthanized to prevent any further pain.

Drivers can also be hit and badly injured following the impact as the animal’s body comes through the windscreen. Moreover, there is the major cost of vehicle replacements or repairs.

To try and reduce this, several roads in Nordland and Troms Counties are now being fitted with ‘elgskremmere’ (‘moose scarers’) to see if they work.

The idea of the device is to prevent moose and other deer-like creatures from crossing. They work by sensors detecting vehicle headlights, with a high frequency sound then produced to keep them off the roads.

Norwegian media report they measure various parameters hourly and are based on 15 years’ worth of studying collisions involving moose. These include weather, snow amounts, temperatures, light conditions, and phases of the moon

These signs then flash yellow, alerting motorists when the risk of moose is large (so-called ‘dynamiske elgfareskilt’).

The equipment is designed to be an improvement on previous methods such as the traditional red-bordered triangle sign showing a black moose against a white background.

Bus drivers are sceptical of the new system in place, however. Peter Illing told state-owned broadcaster NRK that he does not believe the so-termed ‘elgskremmere’ will work.

He has been driving buses for 30 years, and has encountered many moose near Bodø.

“The moose probably might react at first, but I think it will quickly get used to the sound.”

Statistics Norway’s (SSB) non-harvest mortality rate of cervids – a group of deer including moose – shows 9,124 of these were killed by vehicles between 2012 and 2013.

Of this figure, collisions with vehicles involved 1,118 moose, 606 were killed by trains.




Published on Tuesday, 27th May, 2014 at 21:06 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 27th May 2014 at 21:35.

This post has the following tags: moose, norway, elk, deaths, driving.





  
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