Norway-Russia nuclear safety deal closed / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway-Russia nuclear safety deal closed. Norwegian experts are to help Russia handle her radioactive waste in a safe and proper manner, reports say. 120 Russian submarines have been scrapped so far at Andreyeva Bay near Murmansk, with the nuclear fuel rods now to be destroyed. Andreyeva Bay is the largest storage facility in the Northern Fleet for radioactive waste.

russiannuclearsubmarines, andreyevabay



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Norway-Russia nuclear safety deal closed

Published on Wednesday, 20th February, 2013 at 20:26 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

Norwegian experts are to help Russia handle her radioactive waste in a safe and proper manner, reports say.



120 Russian submarines have been scrapped so far at Andreyeva Bay near Murmansk, with the nuclear fuel rods now to be destroyed.

Andreyeva Bay is the largest storage facility in the Northern Fleet for radioactive waste.

It has been considered unstable for many years, but many countries including Norway have provided expertise and technology to make it more secure.

In a previous article on The Foreigner, it was reported the facility’s spent nuclear fuel stockpile was about 90 tons.

Any accident that would occur here is just 45 kilometres from the Norwegian border. The 2011/12 Roslyakovo dry dock Delta-IV class ‘Yekaterinburg’ submarine fire was a one example of the possible threat.

The Russian Armed forces and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) signed a deal, Wednesday, which will see more help from Norway to improve safety at the site.

“Norway has much to contribute in terms of procedures and practices for nuclear safety, radiation protection guidelines and generally how to increase security against harmful substances” the NRPA’s Malgorzata Sneve told Aftenposten.

Norway is also helping to train inspectors to monitor the procedures at Andreyeva to ensure that international standards regarding handling of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are followed

“It’s very important that best practices have been incorporated before the risky job of removing fuel rods begins”, said Malgorzata Sneve, “no chances must be taken here.”




Published on Wednesday, 20th February, 2013 at 20:26 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: russiannuclearsubmarines, andreyevabay.





  
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