Norway school uses zombies to teach ethics / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway school uses zombies to teach ethics. A Bergen 6th-Form college is using video game ‘The Walking Dead’ to teach students about principles. The game from Telltale Games is based on the comics created by Robert Kirkman which follow a group of survivors in a zombie apocalypse in Georgia in the United States. His comics were adapted into a television series in 2010. Currently on its fourth, its success has led to the video game.

norwayeducation, norwayschools



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Norway school uses zombies to teach ethics

Published on Thursday, 16th January, 2014 at 14:12 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 18th January 2014 at 12:47.

A Bergen 6th-Form college is using video game ‘The Walking Dead’ to teach students about principles.



The game from Telltale Games is based on the comics created by Robert Kirkman which follow a group of survivors in a zombie apocalypse in Georgia in the United States.

His comics were adapted into a television series in 2010. Currently on its fourth, its success has led to the video game.

The TV programmes use characters from the comics, but the game introduces new characters. These include convicted murderer Lee Everett and a young girl called Clementine he is forced to look after.

The game is character-driven and the decisions made by players during tasks affect how the game develops.

“Experiences with this approach are currently very good,” Tobias Staaby, teacher at western Norway’s Nordahl Grieg Upper Secondary School told Vårt Land.

He explained that the students study theories such as the Utilitarianism, Immanuel Kant’s Categorical Imperative and Aristotle's Virtue Ethics. The game has also helped with class discussions.

 “I find there’s a smoother and broader participation in the discussions. These have been known to continue in the breaks in some instances,” said Mr Staaby, who teaches Norwegian, history, and religious studies.

The original game, which first came out in in 2012, consisted of five episodes. A follow up to it has recently been released.

Mr Staaby added that using situations where society has collapsed allows students to really think about what makes a person moral. Dystopias mean the dilemmas become more complicated, according to him. Moreover, using a video game is a lot different to using a film.

“Films are not interactive, primarily. You can discuss them afterwards but pausing a game and discussing “what should we do now?" is more natural,” he concluded.

The post-game discussions and vote on the next course of action then influence how the game develops.

‘The Walking Dead’ was given an 18 rating in Norway. Nordahl Grieg staff has said the game will only be used in classes where students are the right age.



Published on Thursday, 16th January, 2014 at 14:12 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 18th January 2014 at 12:47.

This post has the following tags: norwayeducation, norwayschools.





  
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