Norway scientists study cattle virus prevention methods / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway scientists study cattle virus prevention methods. A cold-like virus is becoming a growing concern with cattle in Norway. A costly infection, it could see the decline in their numbers. BMC Veterinary Research article Occurrence and phylogenetic analysis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in outbreaks of respiratory disease in Norway reported that a “nationwide serological study indicated that 54% of the dairy herds in Norway had BRSV present in the heard.” Herds in some areas tested up to 100% positive. Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) is a common virus that affects cattle on a global level and has an economic impact on beef and dairy producers.

cows, norway, cold, virus



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Norway scientists study cattle virus prevention methods

Published on Thursday, 7th August, 2014 at 01:21 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

A cold-like virus is becoming a growing concern with cattle in Norway. A costly infection, it could see the decline in their numbers.



BMC Veterinary Research article Occurrence and phylogenetic analysis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in outbreaks of respiratory disease in Norway reported that a “nationwide serological study indicated that 54% of the dairy herds in Norway had BRSV present in the heard.” Herds in some areas tested up to 100% positive.

Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) is a common virus that affects cattle on a global level and has an economic impact on beef and dairy producers.

BRSV is an RNA virus, which has ribonucleic acid as its genetic material. The virus can infect and cause disease in all ages of cattle, with young calves often experiencing the most severe disease.

The effect of BRSV:

  • The sudden onset of a watery mucous discharge from the nose and eyes.
  • High fever and coughing.
  • Increasing difficulty in breathing is very typical of the infection in cattle.

Clinical signs of the infection usually begin within 3 to 5 days after cattle have been exposed, lasting 1 to 2 weeks. Rectal temperatures of the infected cattle are raised to between 40 and 42.5°C (104-108.5F). The breathing rate is also increased, usually 40 per minute.

Symptoms can show visually. These include a decreased appetite and appearing depressed. There may also be a sudden drop in milk production or sudden death for grazing cattle that are not seen daily. Outbreaks see a high death-rate, and the case fatality rate can be some 20 per cent.

In Norway the virus was studied to understand the infection, and determine whether the virus could be prevented from spreading.

The Norwegian school of veterinary science published an article in late November last year. 134 Norwegian dairy herds were randomly selected. There were five calves in the herds that were tested for antibodies against the virus, with repeat tests six months later.

A heard was defined as positive if at least one animal between the ages of 150-365 days was shown to have antibodies against the virus. The young age of the animals tested would indicate that they were infected quite recently (during the course of the year).

54 per cent of the herds during the study showed to be BRSV positive, but the virus varied a great deal in different parts of the country. Herds that tested negative were located in close proximity to infected ones and some that remained free of the virus. In close reach of infected herds in the neighbouring area, this indicated that it was possible to prevent a heard from becoming infected.

42 per cent of the herds involved in the study were found to have the virus in the first six months of the inquiry. 33 per cent of that number were no longer infected after that time.

The viral infections in cattle research group at the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science continue to engage in projects to identify the best and effective method of preventing new infections in herds.



Published on Thursday, 7th August, 2014 at 01:21 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

This post has the following tags: cows, norway, cold, virus.





  
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