Norway Segway getaway gathers pace / News / The Foreigner

Norway Segway getaway gathers pace. Interest and use of the motorised two-wheeler is increasing in the Scandinavian country. A law passed in the autumn of 2013 permitting people to drive/ride it came into effect on 1st July this year. A tourist company in southern Norway’s Kristiansand is offering tours for visitors on them.

segway, norway, oslo



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Norway Segway getaway gathers pace

Published on Wednesday, 2nd July, 2014 at 12:57 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Winkelmann   .

Interest and use of the motorised two-wheeler is increasing in the Scandinavian country.

Oslo Gardermoen International Departures
One place people will see Segways.Oslo Gardermoen International Departures
Photo: Knut Bry/Oslo Lufthavn AS


A law passed in the autumn of 2013 permitting people to drive/ride it came into effect on 1st July this year.

A tourist company in southern Norway’s Kristiansand is offering tours for visitors on them.

National newspaper Aftenposten’s intrepid reporter has made a ‘reality TV’ version of his journey in Oslo’s morning rush hour.

Oslo Gardermoen Airport employees are currently testing six of them with an eye to possible purchases this autumn.

Personnel walk about 20,000 steps a day, NRK reports. It may well be that Segway can now help take a load off.

“Our test group consists of 26 employees. They have to undergo six training sessions on use and safety before being allowed on them unsupervised in training mode,” airport press spokesperson Joachim Westher Andersen tells The Foreigner

They started testing the vehicles some three weeks ago. One of them is being used inside the terminal building in Departures

“We have to use them off-peak due to the numbers of people we have here,” says Mr Andersen. “At the same time, the purple-uniformed information person on them is very visible up higher than the rest.”

The other five Segway’s are deployed externally airside. Staff uses for purposes including ID-checking, according to him.

“We’ve had positive feedback from personnel working in the Red Zone. The Segways are more efficient than using an ordinary airport car, and you get to meet people face-to-face. They’re more user-friendly too,” Mr Andersen explains.

Maximum top speed is 20 km/h (about 12.5 mph), 9.6 km/h (almost 6 mph) in training mode.

“So we’re not going to see any Segway-racing near the airport runways,” he concludes.

Dean L. Kamen (b. 1951), an American entrepreneur from New Hampshire, invented the Segway.

British Jimi Heselden, born in Halton Moore, Leeds, bought Segway Inc. in 2010. The 62-year-old died on 26th September that year at Thorp Arch after falling over a cliff while riding a Segway, reports German newspaper Die Welt.



Published on Wednesday, 2nd July, 2014 at 12:57 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Winkelmann   .

This post has the following tags: segway, norway, oslo.





  
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