Norway sends first non-Russian vessel through Northeast Passage / News / The Foreigner

Norway sends first non-Russian vessel through Northeast Passage. Tschudi Shipping has announced it will be sending its iron ore carrier MV Nordic Barents through the Northeast Passage, making it the first non-Russian vessel to use the Northern Sea Route on its way to China. With climate change and the subsequent ice melting, the Arctic Ocean has become more accessible for navigation, giving Europe the possibility to curtail using the long shipping distance to East Asia. The route is approximately 4,000 miles shorter than via the Suez Canal, which was the only sea cargo route connecting Europe to China up to now. 

nordic, bulk, carriers, barents, northeast, passage, icebreakers, russia, china, norway, tschudi, shipping, mikhail, belkinms, rosatomflot, christian, bonfils



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Norway sends first non-Russian vessel through Northeast Passage

Published on Monday, 20th September, 2010 at 09:39 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

Tschudi Shipping has announced it will be sending its iron ore carrier MV Nordic Barents through the Northeast Passage, making it the first non-Russian vessel to use the Northern Sea Route on its way to China.

MV Nordic Barents
MV Nordic Barents
Photo: Nordic Bulk Carriers A/S


With climate change and the subsequent ice melting, the Arctic Ocean has become more accessible for navigation, giving Europe the possibility to curtail using the long shipping distance to East Asia.

The route is approximately 4,000 miles shorter than via the Suez Canal, which was the only sea cargo route connecting Europe to China up to now. 

“…the route is basically competitive with the Suez Canal, and we can subtract the piracy risk," Mikhail Belkinms, assistant general manager of the Russian state-owned Rosatomflot icebreaking fleet told Reuters.

The MV Nordic Barents will carry 41,000 tons of iron ore and will be accompanied by Russian icebreakers to make it through the Northeast Passage, and Tschudi believes that the route will be navigable approximately 2-4 months a year, until the early autumn.

“The Northern Sea Route shortens the distance to China by about one third. This results in a significant reduction in fuel consumption and transportation time, and it also means much lower CO2 emissions. The fuel savings alone add up to approximately $180,000,” managing director of Tschudi subsidiary Nordic Bulk, Christian Bonfils, says in a press release.

However, though the shorter route means reduced fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, the irony is that further industrial activities will probably contribute to climate change and ice melting.

China says it is also considering taking advantage of the Northern Sea Route to make the journey in reverse. 



Published on Monday, 20th September, 2010 at 09:39 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

This post has the following tags: nordic, bulk, carriers, barents, northeast, passage, icebreakers, russia, china, norway, tschudi, shipping, mikhail, belkinms, rosatomflot, christian, bonfils.





  
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