Norway sheep radioactivity falling / News / The Foreigner

Norway sheep radioactivity falling. The number of sheep requiring ‘foddering down’ following 1986’s Chernobyl disaster appear to be decreasing, officials say. Norway’s Agricultural Authority reports 1,914 sheep had to undergo this procedure last year, with 196 claims for compensation. This is “a marked reduction from 2011”, according to them. ‘Foddering down’ involves the animals being fed a controlled caesium-free diet, sometimes laced with a caesium binder (normally ferrocyanides of iron, also known as Prussian blue) six weeks prior to slaughtering.

chernobylaccidentnorway, sheepradioactivity



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Norway sheep radioactivity falling

Published on Monday, 24th June, 2013 at 07:36 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 24th June 2013 at 10:04.

The number of sheep requiring ‘foddering down’ following 1986’s Chernobyl disaster appear to be decreasing, officials say.

Chernobyl reactor 4
Chernobyl reactor 4
Photo: Carl Montgomery/Wikimedia Commons


Norway’s Agricultural Authority reports 1,914 sheep had to undergo this procedure last year, with 196 claims for compensation. This is “a marked reduction from 2011”, according to them.

‘Foddering down’ involves the animals being fed a controlled caesium-free diet, sometimes laced with a caesium binder (normally ferrocyanides of iron, also known as Prussian blue) six weeks prior to slaughtering.

Over two million sheep on a national basis have had to undergo this process since the disaster, and Norway is still counting the cost of the accident.

Sheep are particularly fond of mushrooms, which are known to accumulate caesium. 1986 saw a bumper crop of these, and major amounts of radioactive meat had to be destroyed.

Oppland County towards the middle of Norway was particularly hit, and radioactivity levels in the reindeer grazing on land in Vågå’s Jotunheimen were still excessive in 2010.

In the same year, University of Oslo researchers discovered IQ levels in post-Chernobyl accident children were lower.

They stated that the “accident may have had a subtle effect on the cognitive functioning of those exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation during the most sensitive gestational period.”

“Adolescents exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation in the uterus scored significantly lower in full-scale IQ than unexposed adolescents,” they wrote.

Concerns about the threat nuclear Russia poses to Norway still persist. 2011’sYekaterinburg’ Delta-class submarine fire was a pertinent reminder of this.



Published on Monday, 24th June, 2013 at 07:36 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 24th June 2013 at 10:04.

This post has the following tags: chernobylaccidentnorway, sheepradioactivity.





  
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