Norway Taliban-Afghan government move interesting, says analyst / News / The Foreigner

Norway Taliban-Afghan government move interesting, says analyst. The recent Oslo peace negotiations course offers potential opportunities. “I think reports of the Taliban having attended the seminar are credible,” Kate Clark, Country Director at the Kabul-based Afghanistan Analysts Network (AAN) tells The Foreigner. “The fact that Afghanistan government representatives met with the Taliban is nothing new, though Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai has been trying to get bilateral talks near the top of his agenda since becoming President.”

taliban, afghanistan, oslo



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Norway Taliban-Afghan government move interesting, says analyst

Published on Thursday, 26th March, 2015 at 14:23 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The recent Oslo peace negotiations course offers potential opportunities.

Akershus Castle
The seminar took place here some two weeks ago.Akershus Castle
Photo: Dave Snowden/Flickr


“I think reports of the Taliban having attended the seminar are credible,” Kate Clark, Country Director at the Kabul-based Afghanistan Analysts Network (AAN) tells The Foreigner.

“The fact that Afghanistan government representatives met with the Taliban is nothing new, though Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai has been trying to get bilateral talks near the top of his agenda since becoming President.”

Norwegian authorities invited three members of the Taliban to attend the peace seminar at Oslo’s Akershus festning (fortress), according to broadcaster NRK.

On the agenda for the event, which was organised by the Norwegian Joint Staff College-arranged peace negotiations course were matters such as looking at ceasefire agreements.

Officials from Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs would only comment about the seminar in general terms regarding where delegates came from, and that organisers offered advice.

Norway has facilitated, hosted, and brokered peace agreements before, with varying degrees of success.

The Foreigner asked Ms Clark her opinion of the Scandinavian country’s latest move.

“Having face-to-face interaction in a neutral venue with interesting content on the agenda is generally useful. Moreover, 2014 was the most violent year on record since 2001. There is an urgency to finding ways to end the war.”

According to her, an average of about 55 Afghans are either injured or killed each day, with 800,000 people now displaced internally.

“The invite to both sides to the training course move is a small step in a possibly larger dance, but it is an interesting step, nonetheless,” says Kate Clark.

What do you think the chances of success are?

“Now is a good chance for the Taliban to argue that there is a new government, and the foreigners are out. They could feasibly use that to sell peace rather than war to their followers.”

“Europe and the US would also welcome negotiations. At the same time, however, the dynamics of conflict suggest it is most likely we will see continued insurgency,” Ms Clark concludes.



Published on Thursday, 26th March, 2015 at 14:23 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: taliban, afghanistan, oslo.





  
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