Norway the best country for mothers / News / The Foreigner

Norway the best country for mothers. According to a recent report published by Save the Children, Norway is one the top country in which to be a mother. The “State of the World’s Mothers 2010” report is based on ten criteria, including the economy, education, women's political intervention, health and children’s welfare. Generally, Norway performed either as well as, or better than other countries in all the rankings indicators. It has the highest ratio of female-male income, the highest contraceptive prevalence rate, one of the lowest under-5 mortality rates, and one of the most generous maternity leave policies in the developed world.

mothers, healthcare, childbirth, education, children, mortality, norway, afghanistan



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norway the best country for mothers

Published on Monday, 24th May, 2010 at 15:41 under the news category, by Eddie Mendes.

According to a recent report published by Save the Children, Norway is one the top country in which to be a mother.

Mother-child face to face
Mother-child face to face
Photo: Robert Whitehead/Wikimedia Commons


The “State of the World’s Mothers 2010” report is based on ten criteria, including the economy, education, women's political intervention, health and children’s welfare.

Generally, Norway performed either as well as, or better than other countries in all the rankings indicators. It has the highest ratio of female-male income, the highest contraceptive prevalence rate, one of the lowest under-5 mortality rates, and one of the most generous maternity leave policies in the developed world.

The contrast between top-ranked country Norway, and Afghanistan at the bottom is striking. Skilled health personnel are present at virtually every birth, while fewer than 15 percent of births are attended in Afghanistan.

A typical Norwegian woman has over 18 years of education, and will live to be 83 years old. 82 percent are using some modern method of contraception, and only 1 in 132 women will lose a child before its fifth birthday.

In Afghanistan, a typical woman has just over 4 years of education and has a life expectancy of just 44 years. Only 16 percent of women are using modern contraception and more than one child in four dies before reaching its fifth birthday. At this rate, every mother in Afghanistan is likely to suffer the loss of a child.

The data collected documents the tremendous gaps between rich and poor countries and the urgent need to accelerate progress in the health and well-being of mothers and their children. The data also highlights the regional dimension of this tragedy. Three of the bottom 10 countries are Arab States and seven are in sub-Saharan Africa, which also accounts for 16 of the 20 lowest-ranked countries.

Save the Children is still concerned about healthcare in many countries. The report states, that in Angola, for example, one in five children doesn’t live to be five years old.

The list of 160 countries, including 43 developed countries and 117 developing countries, Portugal occupies the 20th place, leaving Afghanistan in the last position.



Published on Monday, 24th May, 2010 at 15:41 under the news category, by Eddie Mendes.

This post has the following tags: mothers, healthcare, childbirth, education, children, mortality, norway, afghanistan.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!