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The Foreigner Norway the best place to be a working woman. Publication The Economist created a “glass ceiling index” on the event of International Women’s Day, 8th March. It showed which countries had the maximum chances of equal treatment at work in relation to the so-termed glass ceiling. Glass ceiling is a term used for an invisible and indestructible barrier that keeps women and minorities from rising to the upper rungs of the corporate ladder, regardless of their qualifications and/or achievements

norwaywork, womennorway, genderequality



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Norway the best place to be a working woman

Published on Sunday, 9th March, 2014 at 20:55 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari.
Last Updated on 10th March 2014 at 15:47.

Publication The Economist created a “glass ceiling index” on the event of International Women’s Day, 8th March.



It showed which countries had the maximum chances of equal treatment at work in relation to the so-termed glass ceiling.

Glass ceiling is a term used for an invisible and indestructible barrier that keeps women and minorities from rising to the upper rungs of the corporate ladder, regardless of their qualifications and/or achievements

The index, which focused specifically on industrialized nations, took nine factors into account.

These were higher education gap, labor force participation, wage differences, share of women senior managers, women on company boards, child-care costs, paid maternity leave, share of GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) candidates, and women in parliament.

Norway came in first place with 78.7 points out of 100 overall closely followed by Sweden at 78.1, and Finland at 77.1. The OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) average is 53.8 points.

The Economist also notes that the gender wage gap of the latter countries are close to the OECD’s average of 15%, while Norway has fallen to 8%.

Moreover, nearly 40% of board members are women in large listed companies in Norway.

This is mostly thanks to the introduction of mandatory quotas six years ago.

“That is twice the share in the European Union, which is considering bringing in quotas if the current voluntary approach fails,” the report states.

South Korea scored lowest with 15.5% overall.

Here are the figures for Norway:

  • Higher education (25-64, tertiary education, 2001 figures): 9.1%
  • Labor force (2012 figures): -4.8%
  • Wage gap (2011/latest): 7.8%
  • Female senior managers share (2010/latest): 34.4%
  • Women on company boards (2013): 36.1%
  • Child-care costs (2008, net): 16.7% of average wage
  • Maternity leave (20011-12): 9 weeks at 100% of last earnings
  • GMAT exams taken (2012-13): 28.2% of total
  • Women in parliament (2013): 39.6% of total.

The complete scale and country list can be found here.




Published on Sunday, 9th March, 2014 at 20:55 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari.
Last updated on 10th March 2014 at 15:47.

This post has the following tags: norwaywork, womennorway, genderequality.





  
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