Norway to research Russia policies / News / The Foreigner

Norway to research Russia policies. The Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs is to allocate 105 million kroner to keep updated with Russian activities in the High North. Saying the move is also important for dealings with Russia, Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre declared, “Russia and the High North are key areas in Norwegian foreign policy. We need access to up-to-date knowledge at any one time to allow us to form good approaches.” “We need to understand developments in Russian society, which also guide Russian foreign policy and cooperation with Norway,” he continued.

barentsseatreatynorwayrussia, norwayrussiaarcticoceantreaty, russianmilitary



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Norway to research Russia policies

Published on Thursday, 8th March, 2012 at 12:50 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs is to allocate 105 million kroner to keep updated with Russian activities in the High North.

L-R: FMs Støre and Lavrov
Foreign Ministers Støre and Lavrov pictured when signing the treatyL-R: FMs Støre and Lavrov
Photo: Ministry of Foreign Affairs/Flickr


Saying the move is also important for dealings with Russia, Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre declared, “Russia and the High North are key areas in Norwegian foreign policy. We need access to up-to-date knowledge at any one time to allow us to form good approaches.”

“We need to understand developments in Russian society, which also guide Russian foreign policy and cooperation with Norway,” he continued.

Though not necessarily related, Vladimir Putin has recently announced a build-up of the country’s Northern submarine Fleet, which Norwegian security officials are following closely. Russia is also reinforcing its troops close to the Norwegian border in the Kola Peninsula.

Ministry of Defence spokesperson Katherine Raadim told The Foreigner they “have witnessed a significant increase in Russian military activity in the Northern area”, but this “should also be seen in the context of the gradual replacement of ageing military hardware and the need to increase training.”

Officials have also stated Norway plans to extend Barents Sea seismic surveys further north. There is also a possibility drones will be used to survey the area following last year’s signing of the Norway-Russia treaty on the Barents Sea and Arctic Ocean, which ended 40 years of disagreement.

Meanwhile, FM Støre says the 105 million kroner allocation to the “Russia and International Relations in the High North” research programme over five years is related to “increased international interest and access to resources as the result of climate change.”

The scheme will have a particular focus on Asia’s importance for the High North.

“Asian countries are increasingly involving themselves in the High North. This means we need more knowledge of their interests in the Arctic when it comes to security policy, energy, polar, and climate research, as well as new transport corridors,” concluded the FM.




Published on Thursday, 8th March, 2012 at 12:50 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: barentsseatreatynorwayrussia, norwayrussiaarcticoceantreaty, russianmilitary.





  
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