Norway top for mothers for 2015 / News / The Foreigner

Norway top for mothers for 2015. The Scandinavian country is the best place for this group, the new annual report shows. Norway and the other four Nordics occupy the first five positions in Save the Children’s 179-country State of the World’s Mothers report for 2015. Their respective Mothers’ Index rankings in this 16th edition are: Norway (1st), Finland (2nd), Iceland (3rd), Denmark (4th), and Sweden (5th).

children, education, poverty



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Norway top for mothers for 2015

Published on Tuesday, 5th May, 2015 at 11:57 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The Scandinavian country is the best place for this group, the new annual report shows.

Mother-child face to face
Mother-child face to face
Photo: Robert Whitehead/Wikimedia Commons


Norway and the other four Nordics occupy the first five positions in Save the Children’s 179-country State of the World’s Mothers report for 2015.

Their respective Mothers’ Index rankings in this 16th edition are: Norway (1st), Finland (2nd), Iceland (3rd), Denmark (4th), and Sweden (5th).

Norway swapped places with Finland for being the best country in this year’s report. Iceland climbed one from its 2014 4th place, Denmark climbed two (6th in 2014), and Sweden dropped two (3rd last year).

“Consistently high performance”

Save the Children says Norway came 1st because it “has strong performance across all five dimensions of maternal and child health and wellbeing.”

These are: maternal health, children’s well-being, education status, economic status, and political status.

“Norway performs the absolute “best” on economic status and is the only country to place in the top 12 on all five indicators. It is consistently high performance that puts Norway on top,” it is stated.

Richest

The report ranks Norway as being the wealthiest country in world, having a national wealth of over USD 90,000 per capita, and with women holding 40 per cent of parliamentary seats.

According to the NGO, maternal death in Norway is rare. The lifetime chance of dying in pregnancy or childbirth is about 1 in 15,000.

The statistics for children show that 0.3 per cent does not live to see their fifth birthday (one in 188 women is likely to suffer the loss of a young child), and the typical Norwegian child stays in school for an average of 17.5 years.

Largest

Positions six to ten of 2015’s Mothers’ Index, in descending order, are occupied by Netherlands (6th, down one on 2014) Spain (7th, no change), Germany (8th, no change), Australia (9th, no change), and Belgium (10th, down one from tied 9th).

This year’s report is the NGO’s largest-ever when it comes to numbers of countries they have included.

“The top 10 countries, in general, attain very high scores for mothers’ and children’s health, educational, economic, and political status,” it is stated.

Bad conditions

Save the Children’s 2015 State of the World’s Mothers report lists the bottom 10 countries, in descending order, as being:

  • Haiti, Sierra Leone (tied 169th)
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Chad
  • Ivory Coast
  • Gambia
  • Niger
  • Mali
  • Central African Republic
  • DR Congo
  • Somalia

Some 74 per cent of Somalia’s urban residents live in slums, and child mortality rates tend to be high amongst this group of people.

One in 18 Somali women is likely “to eventually die of a maternal cause”, says Save the Children.

Nearly 15 per cent of Somali children do not live to see their fifth birthday – nine out of ten Somali mothers are likely to lose a child under the age of five.

Disparities

Moreover, children in Somali, one of the poorest countries in the world and where just 14 per cent of Somali women hold seats in parliament, “can expect to receive less than 2.5 years of formal education”.

“It should be noted that not all Somali children are equally bad off. National averages mask large sub-national disparities. Recent survey data* suggest some northern areas have under-5 mortality rates that are less than half the national average,” Save the Children concludes.

*UNICEF Somalia and Somaliland Ministry of Planning and National Development. Somaliland Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011, Final Report. (Nairobi, Kenya: 2014).

The full State of the World’s Mothers report for 2015 can be read here.



Published on Tuesday, 5th May, 2015 at 11:57 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: children, education, poverty.





  
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