Norway traffic pollution levels on the rise / News / The Foreigner

Norway traffic pollution levels on the rise. Europe’s air still faces problems deemed harmful to health despite reductions in emission levels of air pollutants, a World Health Organization (WHO) report shows. Emissions of main pollutants here have declined in a 10-year period, but the European Environment Agency (EEA) found two specific pollutants that have continued to be a health-threat. These include breathing problems, cardiovascular disease and shortened lives.      According to the latest EEA-published air quality from 2002 to 2012 assessment, these pollutants are particulate matter and ground level ozone.

norwaypollution, trafficnorway, norwayroads



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Norway traffic pollution levels on the rise

Published on Monday, 21st October, 2013 at 14:00 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.

Europe’s air still faces problems deemed harmful to health despite reductions in emission levels of air pollutants, a World Health Organization (WHO) report shows.

Pollution
Pollution
Photo: Dr. Keats/Flickr


Emissions of main pollutants here have declined in a 10-year period, but the European Environment Agency (EEA) found two specific pollutants that have continued to be a health-threat. These include breathing problems, cardiovascular disease and shortened lives.     

According to the latest EEA-published air quality from 2002 to 2012 assessment, these pollutants are particulate matter and ground level ozone.

Two environments that stood out where the effect of poor air quality has been experienced the most strongly are urban areas and ecosystems.

“Large parts of the population do not live in a healthy environment, according to current standards,” said EEA Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx.

The report also shows specific individual sectors have experienced an increase of some pollutants within the studied timeframe.

This includes particulate matter emissions from full combustion in the commercial, institutional and household sectors. These have increased by 7 percent since 2002.

Three pollutants - Nitrogen Dioxide, Cadmium and Sulphur Dioxide - have been found to be of concern in Norway. 

10 out of 24 countries had increasing hourly concentration of Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) in urban traffic monitoring stations.

Norway was found to have the most rapidly increasing average trend, followed by Portugal.

The study also stated that half of the monitoring stations around Europe with measurements since 2006 showed a reduction in the concentration of Cadmium during the last six years.

Furthermore, it showed that the number of stations that measure Cadmium concentrations in the air had increased significantly over the years.

Only 37 stations registered Cadmium concentrations in the air in 2002, while the number increased to 665 in 2011, covering 23 European Union states as well as Norway and Switzerland.

The limit value of Sulphur Dioxide for the protection of vegetation set for the winter period of 2011 were exceeded in two rural industrial stations, including in one Norway, close to the Russian border.

“To get on to a sustainable path, Europe will have to be ambitious and go beyond current legislation,” EEA Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx stated.




Published on Monday, 21st October, 2013 at 14:00 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.

This post has the following tags: norwaypollution, trafficnorway, norwayroads.





  
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