Norway Viking longboat graces the UK / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway Viking longboat graces the UK. The world’s largest reconstructed Viking longship will soon be setting sail from Norwegian shores. Draken Harald Hårfagre, named after the Viking Harald the Fairhair, is to visit Liverpool on her maiden voyage as part of the July’s Hoylake Golf Open tournament. Having journeyed from western Norway’s Haugesund, the 115-foot vessel (about 340 metres) will then be rowed down the River Mersey following her some three-week journey.

vikings, norway, uk



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Norway Viking longboat graces the UK

Published on Wednesday, 4th June, 2014 at 00:13 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 4th June 2014 at 10:53.

The world’s largest reconstructed Viking longship will soon be setting sail from Norwegian shores.



Draken Harald Hårfagre, named after the Viking Harald the Fairhair, is to visit Liverpool on her maiden voyage as part of the July’s Hoylake Golf Open tournament.

Having journeyed from western Norway’s Haugesund, the 115-foot vessel (about 340 metres) will then be rowed down the River Mersey following her some three-week journey.

The Liverpool Echo also reports she will arrive at the time of the Open Tournament at the Royal Liverpool Golf Club in northeast Britain’s Wirral.

The longboat during construction
The longboat during construction
Marit Synnøve Vea/Wikimedia Commons
The dream of Norwegian businessman Sigurd Aase, construction of Draken Harald Hårfagre began in March 2010. It was launched some two years later in June of that year.

Viking Harald Hårfagre (born about 852, died about 931-2) – Haraldr hárfagri in Old Norse – was considered the first king of major parts of Norway.

He united the country following the Battle of Hafrsfjord, which is traditionally thought to have occurred in 852.

Western Norway’s Hafrsfjord is in the municipality of Stavanger. Three large stone swords put into the mountain can be found to commemorate the battle.

Draken Harald Hårfagre has an approximately 3,230-square foot sail (about 300 square metres) made of silk. The sail is nearly 115 feet long and about 26 feet wide (35m by 8m), and the vessel has a displacement of about 70 tons.

Viking longboat Draken Harald Hårfagre
Viking longboat Draken Harald Hårfagre
Marit Synnøve Vea/Wikimedia Commons
The oak longship has 25 pairs of oars and requires two people on each oar. A crew of more than a hundred specially-trained “Viking Navy” volunteers are manning her for the voyage. It is expected she will reach West Float, in Wallasey on 18th July.

“It’s tremendous news for Wirral and Liverpool and very poignant concerning the huge Norse roots of the area,” said Professor Steve Harding, Wallasey-born Merseyside Viking expert, who helped secure the longboat’s visit.

“The West Float, between Duke Street and Penny Bridge on the Wallasey docks, is the site of the former Wallasey Pool and its highly likely there would have been longships here a millennium ago, and now, after this break, there will be one here again,” he also told the paper.

Draken Harald Hårfagre (external link) is scheduled to return to Norway’s Haugesund on 3rd August.




Published on Wednesday, 4th June, 2014 at 00:13 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 4th June 2014 at 10:53.

This post has the following tags: vikings, norway, uk.





  
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