Norway welcomes visitors with a scream / News / The Foreigner

Norway welcomes visitors with a scream. If you hear loud noises of disapproval from passengers at Oslo Gardermoen, it is probably due to the 150th anniversary celebration of painter Edvard Munch’s birth rather than the high prices. Part of the beginning of The Munch Year saw the artist on stamps designed by Enzo Finger. Two Airport Express Trains were transformed into Munch's scream on rails this month. Mr Finger once again laid his artistic hand on it. “We’ve put the Munch motif on two trains. These will be operating with this until the end of 2013,” Lena A.Nesteby, Airport Express Train marketing and communications director, tells The Foreigner.

edvardmunch, thescream, oslogardermoenairport



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Norway welcomes visitors with a scream

Published on Friday, 19th April, 2013 at 10:17 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.

If you hear loud noises of disapproval from passengers at Oslo Gardermoen, it is probably due to the 150th anniversary celebration of painter Edvard Munch’s birth rather than the high prices.

Edvard Munch's 'The Scream' on the Oslo Airport Express
Edvard Munch's 'The Scream' on the Oslo Airport Express
Photo: Lars Frøystein


Part of the beginning of The Munch Year saw the artist on stamps designed by Enzo Finger. Two Airport Express Trains were transformed into Munch's scream on rails this month. Mr Finger once again laid his artistic hand on it.

“We’ve put the Munch motif on two trains. These will be operating with this until the end of 2013,” Lena A.Nesteby, Airport Express Train marketing and communications director, tells The Foreigner.

Arriving visitors to Norway are already met with reproductions of Munch at the bottom of the escalators. The train scream adds to this.

So does it seem like The Munch Year is off the rails? Not according to the Munch Museum’s Bård Hammervold.

“It’s incredible fun to see Munch's "Scream" whiz by at 200kph”, he says. “I’m convinced that Edvard Munch himself would have liked to have exhibited his work in this way.”

“It’s very inspiring that an established company chooses to join the celebration of the 150th anniversary of the birth of Munch. We’re now really on track and look forward to what promises to be a continuing great celebration,” Mr Hammervold adds.

Edvard Munch painted "The Scream" after an anxiety-filled trip on hill at Ekeberg above Oslo.

His subsequent diary entry, dated 22nd January 1892, Nice, read “I was walking along the road with two friends. The sun was setting. I felt a breath of melancholy. Suddenly the sky turned blood-red.”

“I stopped, and leaned against the railing, deathly tired - looking out across the flaming clouds that hung like blood and a sword over the blue-black fjord and town. My friends walked on – I stood there, trembling with fear. And I sensed a great, infinite scream pass through nature,” he wrote.

A ticket at the Munch museum also includes entrance to the National Museum, and vice versa. The exhibition of 250 works opens on 2nd June.

But does a train ticket cover the entrance to the museum?

“We have no plans for this. But it might be a good idea,” answers an Airport Express Train spokesperson.




Published on Friday, 19th April, 2013 at 10:17 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.

This post has the following tags: edvardmunch, thescream, oslogardermoenairport.





  
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