Norway working rules changes irk unions / News / The Foreigner

Norway working rules changes irk unions. UPDATED: Temporary workers should not have the same pay and working conditions as the firm’s own employees, politicians propose. Unions warn of trouble. Progress’ (FrP) Minister of Labour Robert Eriksson is in favour of exemptions from the equal treatment principle. This principle forms part of the EU Temporary Workers Directive.

norway, work, unions



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Norway working rules changes irk unions

Published on Thursday, 12th June, 2014 at 07:23 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Winkelmann   .
Last Updated on 12th June 2014 at 22:46.

UPDATED: Temporary workers should not have the same pay and working conditions as the firm’s own employees, politicians propose. Unions warn of trouble.

Minister of Labour and Social Affairs Robert Eriksson
The Labour Minister has stirred unions with his proposed amendments.Minister of Labour and Social Affairs Robert Eriksson
Photo: Progress Party/Flickr


Progress’ (FrP) Minister of Labour Robert Eriksson is in favour of exemptions from the equal treatment principle.

This principle forms part of the EU Temporary Workers Directive.

The exemption will bring Norway in line with labour market conditions similar to Sweden, Denmark and Finland, Dagens Næringsliv reports the Minister as saying.

It would include allowing firms increased decision-making regarding use of overtime and working on Sundays.

Minister Eriksson also wants to dispense with the rule forcing 70-year-olds to retire.

“Working life is constantly changing, requiring more flexibility to meet modern business and family life. We propose changing rules for temporary employment, working time, and age limits,” says the Minister in a statement.

According to him permanent employment will remain as a principle stipulation for working life, but employing people on a temporary basis is to be easier.

“Several studies show that temporary employment can be a springboard into the workforce for many. The choice for some workers lacking experience is not between permanent and temporary employment. It stands between temporary work and no job,” Minister Eriksson adds.

The United Kingdom has seen a similar case. The Trades Union Congress (TUC) has complained to the EU over temporary agency workers’ unequal treatment, reports website Workplace Savings and Benefits (WSB).

TUC secretary general Frances O’Grady has points out that exemptions produce a situation in which “employment that offers no job security, poor career progression and often low pay”.

Moreover, people are “often unable to plan and budget from one month to the next, energy bills are a struggle and home ownership is a pipe dream”.

Norway’s Confederation of Trade Unions (LO) is critical to the move, however, saying they will be protesting against the Minister’s proposals.

Leader Gerd Kristiansen comments in a statement that they mean “employers get increased power over employees’ everyday life.”

“These proposals lessen employees and their chosen representatives’ influence on working life.”

Demonstrations before the parliament building are planned for next week, workers’ organisations tell Klassekampen.

“We must light the beacons and let it [news of the issue] travel from city to city. They’ll get to see the resistance,” says LO Stavanger region leader Rolf Bersås.

The main proposals Labour Minister Robert Eriksson comes with are:

  • Increase access to temporary employment.
  • Relax certain working time rules.
  • Expand limits for overtime.
  • Expand the possibility to agree average working time calculation to allow longer on-duty hours for shift/rota work.
  • Expand working on Sundays possibilities, with the ability of agreeing an increased number of Sundays worked.
  • Abolish collective lawsuit rights when hiring in personnel from staffing agencies.

The government will be sending their amendment propositions for hearing before the summer.




Published on Thursday, 12th June, 2014 at 07:23 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Winkelmann   .
Last updated on 12th June 2014 at 22:46.

This post has the following tags: norway, work, unions.





  
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