Norway WWII book author reprehended / News / The Foreigner

Norway WWII book author reprehended. Over 1,000 Norwegians worked for the Gestapo under the Second World War in some capacity, a new controversial book reveals. Author Eirik Veum writes the names of 1,145 Norwegian citizens in his latest work, Nådeløse Nordmenn: Gestapo.  “We need to be reminded that evil can be Norwegian. Norwegians can also carry out cruel actions if the conditions are right for it,” the writer told NRK, Thursday.

wwii, norway, quisling, nazis, police



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Norway WWII book author reprehended

Published on Thursday, 13th November, 2014 at 13:49 under the news category, by Susanne Tunge Østhus and Michael Sandelson   .

Over 1,000 Norwegians worked for the Gestapo under the Second World War in some capacity, a new controversial book reveals.

Nådeløse Nordmenn book cover
Nådeløse Nordmenn book cover
Photo: Kagge Forlag


Author Eirik Veum writes the names of 1,145 Norwegian citizens in his latest work, Nådeløse Nordmenn: Gestapo

“We need to be reminded that evil can be Norwegian. Norwegians can also carry out cruel actions if the conditions are right for it,” the writer told NRK, Thursday.

The book is the last one in a trilogy about “ruthless Norwegians”. Veum published Statspolitiet in 2012. It covers the Norwegian national socialist police force Statspolitiet (Stapo) and their actions during World War II.

Last year, Hirden, the second book of the trilogy, was published. The title refers to the name of Norway’s Nasjonal Samling’s (NS) political troops, which then Minister of Defence Vidkun Quisling founded. The plot revolves around this fascist organisation and the war crimes they committed.

“Important and talented informants”

Eirik Veum’s latest book unravels new information about the inner workings of Norwegian informants for the Gestapo, but more specifically about the female informants. 

“Some of the most important and most talented informants that the Gestapo managed to recruit were women. These were often young girls, who could initiate love affairs with resistance fighters, and in that way they managed to get information that was very important. Several of them could not be tracked down until long after the War was over,” said Veum.

He identifies Aud Maggi Andersen as one of the most proficient Gestapo agents. Her control officer describes her as executing her missions with prudence and skill, despite the fact that she only had public school (Folkeskole) education. She started working for them at 23 years old.

“Aud Maggi Andersen used methods which entailed entering into sexual relationships and love affairs with resistance fighters. In doing so she managed to uncover extensive resistance operations in the Oslo area,” Veum told NRK.

The distinction between Aud Maggi Andersen and other Norwegian female agents is that she was the only one to receive a death sentence. However, the sentence was never carried out.

Norway’s Supreme Court overturned the sentence, handing down a new verdict of forced labour for life. She was pardoned after serving some 5 years of her sentence.

Aud Maggi Andersen’ son, Roy Vidar Bernhus, told NRK he thinks it is important his mother’s story is revealed.

“There are many who do not like this coming out. But I see no reason not to tell what happened. There were so many Norwegians who were on the wrong side during the War, it is important that these stories emerge,” he told NRK.

Family rifts

Strong criticism has been directed at Veum and his books, however. One person is University of Oslo Professor Emeritus Ole Kristian Grimnes. He has studied war history since the 1970s, and censures Veum for “making money on other people’s suffering” via his trilogy.

“It's okay that he studies the Gestapo, and Veum helps with research in this field. But I don’t see the point of having every name listed, and I don’t think he should do it. It’s obvious that it reopens old wounds in families, which can be painful,” said the Professor.Trondheim-based publication Adresseavisen spoke with one of the people Veum named in his first book. The man, who explained he was against Nazism, but pro-NS, wanted to stop its publication.

According to him, Vidkun Quisling was a good man. The NS sympathiser added that he was afraid that Eirik Veum’s first book would cause a huge rift in his family, however.

“They don’t know everything I did,” said the man.

Eirik Veum remarked that he “knew the book would be controversial”, and that “none of the [still living Norwegian Statspolitiet] that I contacted showed remorse.”

Nådeløse Nordmenn: Gestapo is published by Kagge Forlag.



Published on Thursday, 13th November, 2014 at 13:49 under the news category, by Susanne Tunge Østhus and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: wwii, norway, quisling, nazis, police.





  
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