Norway WWII resistance member artefacts discovered / News / The Foreigner

Norway WWII resistance member artefacts discovered. A box containing items belonging to an arrested resistance member Sigrid Nordrum has been found in Gudbrandsdalen, Oppland County. The discovery, which contains messages and photos, is believed to be from the time she was held captive in Grini prison camp between 1943 and 1945. Grini (‘Polizeihäftlingslager Grini’ in German) was the largest prisoner camp under the War, established in 1941 at Ila’s women’s jail outside Oslo. It was used for interning officers between April and June 1940.

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Norway WWII resistance member artefacts discovered

Published on Thursday, 20th June, 2013 at 07:19 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 20th June 2013 at 07:34.

A box containing items belonging to an arrested resistance member Sigrid Nordrum has been found in Gudbrandsdalen, Oppland County.

Grini prisoner camp outside Oslo
This picture is believed to be from the time between 1941 and 1943Grini prisoner camp outside Oslo
Photo: Royal Norwegian Information Service, Washington D.C./Wikimedia Commons


The discovery, which contains messages and photos, is believed to be from the time she was held captive in Grini prison camp between 1943 and 1945.

Grini (‘Polizeihäftlingslager Grini’ in German) was the largest prisoner camp under the War, established in 1941 at Ila’s women’s jail outside Oslo. It was used for interning officers between April and June 1940.

Sigrid Nordrum used the name ‘Kess’ during her time with the Resistance, making her one of the few women involved to have a codename.

She continued to help the resistance from prison. This was even after her capture on 20th May 1943, aged 25, after picking up an illegal package from her two brothers.

NRK also reports the Gestapo shot one of them, the other was tortured. They had been reported by a childhood friend.

“She worked a lot on sending things out of prison, and was very active in using her days helping others,” Torveig Dahl, director of Gudbrandsdalmuseet told the broadcaster. “She also communicated with the outside world to bring news to the other prisoners at Grini using signing with her fingers.”

The box was discovered by Sigrid Nordum’s descendants after she died in 2008. She was neither recognised for her resistance efforts under WWII, nor did she speak of her experiences at Grini prisoner camp.

Amongst other Norwegian resistance members held at Grini was Einar Gerhardsen, Labour Prime Minister of Norway between 1963 and 1965.

Centrist (Sp) Prime Minister Per Borten succeeded him, holding office between 1965 and 1971. Mr Borten, who died in 2005, was current Sp Petroleum and Energy Minister Ola Borten Moe’s grandfather.




Published on Thursday, 20th June, 2013 at 07:19 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 20th June 2013 at 07:34.

This post has the following tags: norwayresistance, rjukanheavywaterplant, wwiinorway.





  
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