Norway’s Eleventh Commandment / News / The Foreigner

Norway’s Eleventh Commandment. Winter is the season when trees are cut down and thy neighbour seems to own some of the more annoying ones. National newspaper Aftenposten runs a long article today about hedge and tree felling rights. According to lawyer Ole Fæhn, there are rules about how high trees can be, but people do frequently misunderstand them. For example, a tree that is planted at a distance of three meters from the neighbour’s plot of land can be three meters tall. However, if said three-meter tall tree be planted one meter from aforementioned plot, said neighbour may declare "thou shalt not fell."

norwaytrees, norwaylegislation, norwayquarrels, arguingneighbours



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Norway’s Eleventh Commandment

Published on Saturday, 16th March, 2013 at 20:55 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.
Last Updated on 17th March 2013 at 09:17.

Winter is the season when trees are cut down and thy neighbour seems to own some of the more annoying ones.

Sunshine through the trees
Sunshine through the trees
Photo: ©2013 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


National newspaper Aftenposten runs a long article today about hedge and tree felling rights. According to lawyer Ole Fæhn, there are rules about how high trees can be, but people do frequently misunderstand them.

For example, a tree that is planted at a distance of three meters from the neighbour’s plot of land can be three meters tall. However, if said three-meter tall tree be planted one meter from aforementioned plot, said neighbour may declare "thou shalt not fell."

As for removing roots that grow into and branches that overhang your garden, you can only take these away if you send them an epistle and he/she acteth not upon it.

At the same time, the rules do not cover hedges that are below two meters. There are also other factors that come into play when it comes to trees, such as shielding from wind, how much you can see them turning the other cheek in their house, and visual beatitude.

Today’s article also points out that trees often are the root of neighbourhood quarrels, an almost universal theme.

University of Oslo psychologist Fanny Duckert explained a good way to avoid these quarrels was to see it from the others’ – in this case, your neighbour’s – point of view.

Moreover, felling your neighbour’s tree is not easy. Several cases have gone for adjudication.

Let there be light.


Published on Saturday, 16th March, 2013 at 20:55 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.
Last updated on 17th March 2013 at 09:17.

This post has the following tags: norwaytrees, norwaylegislation, norwayquarrels, arguingneighbours.





  
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