Norway’s TV oddities: wild, wet, and woody / News / The Foreigner

Norway’s TV oddities: wild, wet, and woody. The good times are continuing to roll for Norwegians as well as those TV viewers after something different. Edvard Munch’s ‘The Scream’ by was the most expensive painting ever sold at auction, film ‘Kon-Tiki’ is nominated for an Oscar, and several programmes have highlighted Norwegians’ weird sense of good entertainment. Screaming successes have been ‘Hurtigruten’ – broadcasting some 135 hours of non-stop coastline – caught the eyes of 2,5 million Norwegians and countless abroad, and a camera put in front of a train captured 12-hours non-stop tunnels, rails and landscape.

norwaytv, norwegianwood



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Norway’s TV oddities: wild, wet, and woody

Published on Tuesday, 19th February, 2013 at 10:28 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last Updated on 25th February 2013 at 17:50.

The good times are continuing to roll for Norwegians as well as those TV viewers after something different.

A Norwegian fire
A Norwegian fire
Photo: ©2013 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


Edvard Munch’s ‘The Scream’ by was the most expensive painting ever sold at auction, film ‘Kon-Tiki’ is nominated for an Oscar, and several programmes have highlighted Norwegians’ weird sense of good entertainment.

Screaming successes have been ‘Hurtigruten’ – broadcasting some 135 hours of non-stop coastline – caught the eyes of 2,5 million Norwegians and countless abroad, and a camera put in front of a train captured 12-hours non-stop tunnels, rails and landscape.

Now there was ‘Hel Ved’ – 12 hours of the art of wood burning on real time TV, a success also picked up by the international press.

To explain: book ‘Hel Ved’ (firewood) is a play on words, as it also means “strong character”.

Author Lars Mytting sold 150 000 copies in Norway. It is a book about chopping, drying, and burning wood; a poetic journey into the woods. MacLehose Press has translated the work in Britain.

But looking beneath the (wood tarpaulin) covers, poetry, music, and voyeurism – social – were also part of the ‘Hel Ved’ programme.

Psychologist and poet Helge Torvund, who read his poem ‘Skal me leggja ei vedstabel’ (‘Shall we make a wood pile’), was nicknamed the "Twitter poet" when he actively started using social media to spread poetry.

He gives poetry lessons online at Diktkammeret (The Poetry Chamber), a forum for writing this literary art form. The best poet is chosen monthly, interviewed, and gets his/her poem published in the daily tabloid Dagbladet.

Meanwhile, back at the pile, a competition – initiated at the request of ‘Cupido’ erotic magazine editor Tore Aasheim – was organized for the best erotic poems.

This contest coincided with the 12th anniversary of The Poetry Chamber. About 20 participants in Dagbladets Poetry Chamber have debuted with poetry books, and Helge Torvund has written 25,524 posts over the years.

The wood was still burning in many Norwegian households when the clock struck midnight on Valentine’s Day, with 547 erotic poem entries.

There were about five times as many submissions to this contest compared with the last one.

The jury, who judged the poems’ level of eroticism, consists of queen of crime books Unni Lindell, famous Norwegian author Anne B.Ragde, Cupido's Tore Aasheim, and Dagbladet.

Dagbladet posed the question "What is an erotic poem? Is it juicy, a to the point and horny description of reality, or is it the mysterious, intriguing and slightly blurred dream? Is it a romantic adventure or a porn fantasy?”

“That’s right, all of it,” Cupido editor Tore Aasheim answered.

976,000 people watched the ‘Hel Ved’ program, which had an average of between 155,000 and 158, 000 viewers. This was about three times more than usual.

And when the Norwegian wood burns up, erotic poetry will see them through the winter, which lasts until April.




Published on Tuesday, 19th February, 2013 at 10:28 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last updated on 25th February 2013 at 17:50.

This post has the following tags: norwaytv, norwegianwood.





  
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