Norwegian anti-terror law outdated / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian anti-terror law outdated. Several politicians have called for a revision to Norway’s anti-terror law. Whilst planning by several people is illegal, there is nothing to stop individuals doing the same. “We need legislation that ensures national security, regardless of whether there are one or several people planning to commit acts of terror,” Jan Arild Ellingsen, FrP’s (Progress Party) representative on the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence tells Aftenposten. The three men from Uyghur (China), Iraq, and Uzbekistan with alleged links to al-Qaida, were arrested at the beginning of July on suspicion of planning to attack a target in Norway. They face a new custody arraignment today.

oslo, al-qaida, arrest, terrorists, suspects, pst, police, security, service, bomb, target, janne, kristiansen, anti-terror, law



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Norwegian anti-terror law outdated

Published on Monday, 4th October, 2010 at 13:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 4th October 2010 at 13:28.

Several politicians have called for a revision to Norway’s anti-terror law. Whilst planning by several people is illegal, there is nothing to stop individuals doing the same.

Main chamber of the Norwegian Parliament
Main chamber of the Norwegian Parliament
Photo: Allison Harger/Flickr


Uncertain

“We need legislation that ensures national security, regardless of whether there are one or several people planning to commit acts of terror,” Jan Arild Ellingsen, FrP’s (Progress Party) representative on the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence tells Aftenposten.

The three men from Uyghur (China), Iraq, and Uzbekistan with alleged links to al-Qaida, were arrested at the beginning of July on suspicion of planning to attack a target in Norway. They face a new custody arraignment today.

Ellingsen fears the PST (Police Security Service) will find proving they formed a terror network difficult, making sentencing uncertain.

Criminal lawyer Morten Furuholmen has told The Foreigner earlier he “would not be surprised if they were not convicted”.

Moreover, the timing of the three’s arrest due to alleged media pressure was not optimal, according to Janne Kristiansen, head of the PST.

Difficult

Only seven people have been indicted under Section 147, commonly known as the anti-terror paragraph, since it was revised in 2003 and 2008. None of the have been found guilty.

Jan Bøhler, Labour’s (Ap) political spokesperson on judicial affairs and Deputy Leader of the Standing Committee on Justice, supports Jan Arild Ellingsen’s calls for a legislative update.

“The consequences of planning terrorist acts by one person can be equally tragic, and it is harder to uncover than when several do it together,” he says.

Meanwhile, both UK and US authorities have advised their nationals to exercise caution when travelling abroad because of fears of increased terrorist activity.





Published on Monday, 4th October, 2010 at 13:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 4th October 2010 at 13:28.

This post has the following tags: oslo, al-qaida, arrest, terrorists, suspects, pst, police, security, service, bomb, target, janne, kristiansen, anti-terror, law.





  
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